anaphora

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a·naph·o·ra

 (ə-năf′ər-ə)
n.
1. The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs; for example, "We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills" (Winston S. Churchill).
2. Linguistics The use of a linguistic unit, such as a pronoun, to refer to the same person or object as another unit, usually a noun. The use of her to refer to the person named by Anne in the sentence Anne asked Edward to pass her the salt is an example of anaphora.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from anapherein, to bring back : ana-, ana- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

an′a·phor′ic (ăn′ə-fôr′ĭk) adj.

anaphora

(əˈnæfərə) or

anaphor

n
1. (Grammar) grammar the use of a word such as a pronoun that has the same reference as a word previously used in the same discourse. In the sentence John wrote the essay in the library but Peter did it at home, both did and it are examples of anaphora. Compare cataphora, exophoric
2. (Rhetoric) rhetoric the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
[C16: via Latin from Greek: repetition, from anapherein, from ana- + pherein to bear]

a•naph•o•ra

(əˈnæf ər ə)

n.
1. the use of a word as a regular grammatical substitute for a preceding word or group of words, as the use of it and do in I know it and they do, too.
2. repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive phrases, verses, clauses, or sentences, as in Shakespeare's “This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.”
[1580–90; < Late Latin < Greek: act of carrying back, reference, n. derivative of anaphérein to carry back, refer to (ana- ana- + phérein to bear1; compare -phore)]
a•naph′o•ral, adj.

anaphora

the repetition of a word or words at the beginning of two or more successive verses or clauses, as the repetition of Blessed in the Beatitudes. Cf. epanaphora, epiphora.anaphoral, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

anaphora

Repetition of a word or words at the beginnings of successive clauses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anaphora - using a pronoun or similar word instead of repeating a word used earlier
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
2.anaphora - repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
Translations
anafora
anafora
anafooranafora

anaphora

n (Liter, Gram) → Anapher f
References in periodicals archive ?
The term is referred, (apparently) anaphorically, to the figure of MacCruiskeen whose previous appearance might be expected to anchor this extra-logical sense, but what MacCruiskeen has been shown doing with boxes makes him an unconvincing agent of a new order of seeing.
the nouns do not take deictic or anaphoric determiners and cannot be referred to anaphorically, e.
The Head of the Propositional Content may be absent (as when that refers anaphorically back to a whole proposition), empty (as with the pro-form one referring back to the head of a prior NP), lexical (e.
For instance, it is well known that demonstrative this can be used both anaphorically and cataphorically, whereas that can only be used anaphorically.
Azzouni develops a regimentation in terms of anaphorically unrestricted quantifiers.
All demonstratives can be used anaphorically in all dialectal varieties of Estonian.
It is either used to refer anaphorically to something already mentioned in the sentence in which it appears, or it is used to refer to something contextually understood and that need not be mentioned (e.
What they do instead is to relate the event or state recounted directly to the present time, and subsequent statements cannot anchor anaphorically on them.
This is normally no problem and the subject can easily be supplied by the context, usually anaphorically, i.
The phrase auch in diesem Film (also in this movie) anaphorically refers to the previously discussed film Nach funf im Urwald and intensifies Anke and Catharina's statement in e-mail 14, lines 1-4 that this movie inappropriately depicts drug use as something normal.
The problem is further exacerbated by the fact that, even when functioning as a particle, si (*sieg) plays many different roles: as a preposed reduplicative marker; for the metrical purpose of making up feet in a line or enhancing a lyrical effect; as an anaphorically employed demonstrative ("this [is] .