anaptyxis

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Related to anaptyctic: Anaptyxis

anaptyxis

(ˌænæpˈtɪksɪs)
n, pl -tyxes (-ˈtɪksiːz)
(Phonetics & Phonology) the insertion of a short vowel between consonants in order to make a word more easily pronounceable
[C19: via New Latin from Greek anaptuxis, from anaptussein to unfold, from ana- + ptussein to fold]
anaptyctic, ˌanapˈtyctical adj
References in periodicals archive ?
In sections on phonology, morphology, and syntax they consider such topics as the Avestan alphabet, the transmission, historical phonology, anaptyctic vowels, consonants, nominal inflection, case endings of the dual and plural, the adjective, prepositions and preverbs, present tense, aorist stems, personal endings, non-finite and nominal forms, case syntax, and negation.
Campbell's treatment (1959: 226-229) highlights that the nature of the base-final segment, whether the base ended in a liquid (1, r) or a nasal (n, m), or neither, was key in the sense that disyllabic neuters of this shape, regardless of root syllable length, typically contained an anaptyctic vowel in zero-inflected forms, like their regular nominative and accusative plural forms (cf.
but even if we were to concede the possibility of metathesis (and perhaps even the anaptyctic insertion of a [d] into a consonantal cluster [nr]).
However, strictly speaking, the so-called anaptyctic vowel e owes its existence as much to the preceding l as it does to the following f.
As an alternative to full transposition, Northumbrian spellings sometimes show an anaptyctic vowel that breaks up the sequence /rx/ (also in early texts: beree(h)t 'bright', uyrihta 'maker').
le-e-pu-us is not free because the anaptyctic vowel at the end of the word marks the interrogative intonation (p.