anastomosis

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Related to anastomoses: arterial anastomosis

a·nas·to·mo·sis

 (ə-năs′tə-mō′sĭs)
n. pl. a·nas·to·mo·ses (-sēz)
1. The connection of separate parts of a branching system to form a network, as of leaf veins, blood vessels, or a river and its branches.
2. Medicine The surgical connection of separate or severed tubular hollow organs to form a continuous channel, as between two parts of the intestine.

[Late Latin anastomōsis, from Greek, outlet, from anastomoun, to furnish with a mouth : ana-, ana- + stoma, mouth.]

a·nas′to·mot′ic (-mŏt′ĭk) adj.

anastomosis

(əˌnæstəˈməʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Anatomy) a natural connection between two tubular structures, such as blood vessels
2. (Surgery) the surgical union of two hollow organs or parts that are normally separate
3. (Botany) the separation and rejoining in a reticulate pattern of the veins of a leaf or of branches
[C16: via New Latin from Greek: opening, from anastomoun to equip with a mouth, from stoma mouth]
anastomotic adj

a•nas•to•mo•sis

(əˌnæs təˈmoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. interconnection between parts of any branching system, as between blood vessels, veinlets in a leaf, or branches of a stream.
2. a joining of two organs or spaces normally not connected.
[1605–15; < New Latin < Greek: opening. See ana-, stoma, -osis]
a•nas′to•mose`, v.t., v.i. -mosed, -mos•ing.
a•nas•to•mot•ic (əˌnæs təˈmɒt ɪk) adj.

anastomosis

connection between parts that have branched off from each other at some earlier point. — anastomotic, adj.
See also: Biology

anastomosis

Surgery to join two tube-like organs, such as pieces of intestine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anastomosis - a natural or surgical joining of parts or branches of tubular structures so as to make or become continuous
colligation, conjugation, conjunction, junction - the state of being joined together
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Cohen and Tamai described the first microsurgical repair technique in 1977; it has been the preferred method of repair since, including venous and arterial anastomoses.
2) When evaluating an end-to-end anastomosis, Doppler evaluation of venous velocities and waveforms should include both supra-and infrahepatic anastomoses.
Anomalous communications between the carotid and vertebrobasilar system arise from fetal remnants of four carotid and vertebrobasilar system anastomoses that once played a vital role in supplying the posterior circulation of the embryo (1-3).
Since its international introduction in 2004 and FDA clearance in 2008, our PAS-Port system has been used by hundreds of surgeons to produce consistent, repeatable proximal anastomoses, with excellent clinical results," commented Bernard A.
Often, the use of microclips, staples or magnets is itself traumatic to blood vessels leading to failure rates comparable to or higher than sutured anastomoses," they wrote.
Low rectal anastomoses have leak rates as high as 10%.
Intercoronary anastomosis: Blumgart et al (1) studied the coronary arteries of 44 pigs and did not find any visible intercoronary anastomoses in 43 hearts.
A comparison of synthetic absorbable suture with synthetic nonabsorbable suture for construction of tracheal anastomoses.
In the postoperative coronary angiography of three patients; 16, 19 and, 23 months after the operation we observed that the anastomoses were patent and free from any narrowing based on the angiographic views.
But altering the flow with specific massage techniques opens the anastomoses and allows the lymph to traverse from one lymphotome to the other, thereby promoting lymph drainage.
10-13) In a comparison between double stapled and hand-sewn anastomosis with ileal reservoir, Sugerman and Newsome (14) found fewer complications, better functional results including better continence, and decreased hospitalizations in those patients who had stapled rather than hand-sewn anastomoses.