ancestor

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an·ces·tor

 (ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. A forerunner or predecessor.
3. Law The person from whom an estate has been inherited.
4. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.

[Middle English auncestre, from Old French, from Latin antecessor, predecessor, from antecessus, past participle of antecēdere, to precede : ante-, ante- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: ancestor, forebear, forefather, progenitor
These nouns denote a person from whom one is descended: a chart showing the genealogy of her ancestors; land once owned by his forebears; a cemetery where some of my forefathers are buried; descended from illustrious progenitors.
Antonym: descendant
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ancestor

(ˈænsɛstə)
n
1. (often plural) a person from whom another is directly descended, esp someone more distant than a grandparent; forefather
2. (Biology) an early type of animal or plant from which a later, usually dissimilar, type has evolved
3. a person or thing regarded as a forerunner of a later person or thing: the ancestor of the modern camera.
[C13: from Old French ancestre, from Late Latin antecēssor one who goes before, from Latin antecēdere; see antecede]
ˈancestress fem n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•ces•tor

(ˈæn sɛs tər; esp. Brit. -sə stər)

n.
1. a person from whom one is descended; forebear; progenitor.
2.
a. the form or stock from which an organism has descended.
b. the actual or assumed earlier type from which a species or other taxon evolved.
3. an object, idea, style, or occurrence serving as a prototype, forerunner, or inspiration to a later one.
4. a person from whom mental, artistic, spiritual, etc., descent is claimed.
[1250–1300; < Old French < Latin antecessor antecessor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancestor - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)ancestor - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)
ancestress - a woman ancestor
forbear, forebear - a person from whom you are descended
forefather, sire, father - the founder of a family; "keep the faith of our forefathers"
foremother - a woman ancestor
primogenitor, progenitor - an ancestor in the direct line
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
descendant, descendent - a person considered as descended from some ancestor or race
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ancestor

noun
1. forefather, predecessor, precursor, forerunner, forebear, antecedent, progenitor He could trace his ancestors back seven hundred years.
forefather successor, offspring, descendant, progeny, inheritor
2. forerunner, predecessor, prototype, precursor The immediate ancestor of rock 'n' roll is rhythm and blues.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

ancestor

noun
1. A person from whom one is descended:
Archaic: predecessor.
2. One that precedes, as in time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَلَفسَلَف، جَد أعْلى
předek
forfaderane
esi-isä
predak
forfaîir
先祖祖先
조상
kilmėprotėvisprotėvių
priekštecissencis
prednik
förfader
บรรพบุรุษ
tổ tiên

ancestor

[ˈænsɪstəʳ] N
1. (= person) → antepasado/a m/f
2. (fig) [of machine, idea, organization] → antecesor(a) m/f, predecesor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ancestor

[ˈænsɛstər] n
(lit)ancêtre mf, aïeul m
(fig) (= antecedent) → ancêtre mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ancestor

nVorfahr m, → Ahne m; (= progenitor)Stammvater m; ancestor worshipAhnenkult m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ancestor

[ˈænsɪstəʳ] nantenato/a, avo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ancestor

(ˈӕnsistə) , ((American) -ses-) feminine ˈancestress noun
a person who was a member of one's family a long time ago and from whom one is descended.
anˈcestral (-ˈses-) adjective
ˈancestryplural ˈancestries noun
a line of ancestors coming down to one's parents. He is of noble ancestry.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ancestor

سَلَف předek forfader Vorfahre πρόγονος antepasado esi-isä ancêtre predak antenato 先祖 조상 voorouder stamfar przodek antepassado предок förfader บรรพบุรุษ ata tổ tiên 祖先
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

ancestor

n antepasado
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As he pointed out after visiting the site of the tollgate smashed-up by his ancester more than 150 years ealier: "In a way it's not a key place for telling the story of Welsh history - it's also a key part of the telling of the story of transport history in Britain.
'British push on 20-mile front this morning' ran the headline on the front page of the the Birmingham Mail's ancester, the Birmingham Despatch on July 1, 1916.
It is assumed that the two families of Perciformes viz., Anabantidae and Osphronemidae evolved from a common ancester, the descandants of which separated into two groups, one moving away to Africa and other to South East Asia., Cretaceous (Froese and Pauly, 2004), when continents were separating into current land masses.
It is a particualry apt time for the Hotal Modern to place us in the shoes of our ancester soldiers.