ancestry

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an·ces·try

 (ăn′sĕs′trē)
n. pl. an·ces·tries
1. Ancestral descent or lineage.
2. Ancestors considered as a group.

[Middle English auncestrie, alteration (influenced by auncestre, ancestor) of Old French ancesserie, from ancessour, ancestor, from Latin antecessor; see ancestor.]

ancestry

(ˈænsɛstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. lineage or descent, esp when ancient, noble, or distinguished
2. ancestors collectively

an•ces•try

(ˈæn sɛs tri; esp. Brit. -sə stri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. ancestral descent; lineage.
2. honorable or distinguished descent: famous by title and ancestry.
3. a series of ancestors.
4. the origin of a phenomenon, object, idea, or style.
5. the history or developmental process of a phenomenon, object, idea, or style.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancestry - the descendants of one individualancestry - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
kinfolk, kinsfolk, phratry, family line, sept, folk, family - people descended from a common ancestor; "his family has lived in Massachusetts since the Mayflower"
side - a family line of descent; "he gets his brains from his father's side"
family tree, genealogy - successive generations of kin
2.ancestry - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodlineancestry - inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents
descent, extraction, origin - properties attributable to your ancestry; "he comes from good origins"
bloodline, pedigree - ancestry of a purebred animal

ancestry

noun origin, house, family, line, race, stock, blood, ancestors, descent, pedigree, extraction, lineage, forebears, antecedents, parentage, forefathers, genealogy, derivation, progenitors They can trace their ancestry back to the seventeenth century.

ancestry

noun
One's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation:
Translations
سِلْسِلَة السَّلَف وَالأجْداد
původrod
slægt
forfeîur, ætterni
predniki
atalarecdat

ancestry

[ˈænsɪstrɪ] N (= lineage) → ascendencia f, linaje m; (= noble birth) → abolengo m

ancestry

[ˈænsɛstri] n
(= ancestors) → ancêtres mpl, aïeux mpl
(= lineage) → ascendance f
of Japanese ancestry → d'ascendance japonaise
to trace one's ancestry → constituer son arbre généalogique

ancestry

n (= descent)Abstammung f, → Herkunft f; (= ancestors)Ahnenreihe f, → Familie f; to trace one’s ancestryseine Abstammung zurückverfolgen; of royal ancestryköniglicher Abstammung or Herkunft

ancestry

[ˈænsɪstrɪ] n (origin) → lignaggio, ascendenza, stirpe f; (forebears) → antenati mpl

ancestor

(ˈӕnsistə) , ((American) -ses-) feminine ˈancestress noun
a person who was a member of one's family a long time ago and from whom one is descended.
anˈcestral (-ˈses-) adjective
ˈancestryplural ˈancestries noun
a line of ancestors coming down to one's parents. He is of noble ancestry.

ancestry

n. ascendencia; extracción étnica, raza; alcurnia.
References in periodicals archive ?
To compare bone ages across age and sex and to account for increased variance related to diverse ancestries, the researchers generated a within-cohort bone age z score.
Instead, it asks respondents to select the ancestry or ancestries with which they "most closely identify" (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006:7).
This hypothesis was supported by an early study of intermarriage among immigrants and the second generation of European ancestries in Australia which shows that persons from ancestry groups that are similar to one another on these social and demographic characteristics are more likely to intermarry.
The researchers asked patients with advanced heart failure to identify their ancestries.
Irish ancestry is the 4th most frequently reported ancestry, behind German, Norwegian, and Other Ancestries.
Locality also may limit significantly the number of ancestries shared among co-residents while increasing the likelihood that some are related by more immediate genealogic connections.
The largest number of ancestries reported by more than 15 million people each.
At first, the reader will be impressed that so much could be known about ancestries, but then, threading through the various accounts of investigations and genealogies, the possibility emerges that large swathes of this knowledge were simply made up.
It is an open-ended question, and those persons who thought of themselves as having more than one origin were free to write in their multiple ancestries.
Another question asks the person to list one or more ancestries, of which the first two were included in the PUMS data file.