ancient history


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Related to ancient history: Medieval history, Modern history

ancient history

n.
1. The history of times long past.
2. Informal Common knowledge, especially of a recent event that has lost its original impact or importance.

ancient history

n
1. (Historical Terms) the history of the ancient world from the earliest known civilizations to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in 476 ad
2. informal a recent event or fact sufficiently familiar to have lost its pertinence

an′cient his′tory


n.
1. the study of study of history before the end of the Western Roman Empire A.D. 476.
2. information or an event that is common knowledge or no longer pertinent.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ancient history - a history of the ancient worldancient history - a history of the ancient world  
account, chronicle, history, story - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
2.ancient history - knowledge of some recent fact or event that has become so commonly known that it has lost its original pertinence
common knowledge - anything generally known to everyone
Translations

ancient history

n (lit)Alte Geschichte; (fig)graue Vorzeit; that’s ancient history (fig)das ist schon längst Geschichte; he’s well-known in the field of ancient historyer ist ein sehr bekannter Altertumsforscher
References in classic literature ?
There were other places where the Lord fell, and others where he rested; but one of the most curious landmarks of ancient history we found on this morning walk through the crooked lanes that lead toward Calvary, was a certain stone built into a house--a stone that was so seamed and scarred that it bore a sort of grotesque resemblance to the human face.
In his oration for the bachelor's degree, he gives me to understand, he will treat of the classical myths, viewed in the aspect of baby stories, and has a great mind to discuss the expediency of using up the whole of ancient history, for the same purpose.
"It's ancient history," said another, guessing that it referred to a former war.
IT IS not a little remarkable that in every case reported by ancient history, in which government has been established with deliberation and consent, the task of framing it has not been committed to an assembly of men, but has been performed by some individual citizen of preeminent wisdom and approved integrity.
"Your ancient history has doubtless told you that Gathol was built upon an island in Throxeus, mightiest of the five oceans of old Barsoom.
That large animals require a luxuriant vegetation, has been a general assumption which has passed from one work to another; but I do not hesitate to say that it is completely false, and that it has vitiated the reasoning of geologists on some points of great interest in the ancient history of the world.
These romances, carrying further the tendency which appears in Sidney's 'Arcadia,' are among the most extravagant of all products of the romantic imagination--strange melanges of ancient history, medieval chivalry, pastoralism, seventeenth century artificial manners, and allegory of current events.
Read the ancient history of the people of God, and tell me if those, by whom Jehovah wrought such marvels among the nations, were then a people of misers and of usurers!
[1] The Ancient History, ten volumes (1730-1738), by the French historian Charles Rollin (1661-1741).
It stood for days upon his chimney-piece, this costly trophy whose ancient history and final fate filled newspaper columns even in these days of Jubilee, and for which the flower of Scotland Yard was said to be seeking high and low.
Readers of ancient history need not be reminded, at this time of day, that there may be Roman virtue even in a Rogue.
The Roman Empire having worked out its destruction, Mr Boffin next appeared in a cab with Rollin's Ancient History, which valuable work being found to possess lethargic properties, broke down, at about the period when the whole of the army of Alexander the Macedonian (at that time about forty thousand strong) burst into tears simultaneously, on his being taken with a shivering fit after bathing.

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