ancientry

ancientry

(ˈeɪnʃəntrɪ)
n
the quality of being ancient, or old-fashioned stylethe olden daysancient lineage

an•cient•ry

(ˈeɪn ʃən tri)

n.
Archaic.
a. ancient character or style.
b. ancient times.
[1540–50]

Ancientry

 elders collectively; antiquities collectively; elders of a parish.
Examples: nobility and ancientry of their houses, 1580; the ancientry of the parish, 1589; cram full of ancientry [‘antiques’], 1866; wronging the ancientry, 1611.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you are lucky to occur here do spare time for acquaintance with local objects of sight-seeing: architectural monuments of the late Russian classicism, the museum of Perm's ancientry, Kamskaya Hydro Power Plant, popular art objects 'The Permian Salty Ears', 'Happiness is sooner than the mountains'.
In The Winter's Tale, Shakespeare pays astute attention to the generation gap when he puts these words in the mouth of a crusty Shepherd complaining about the youth, who are up to nothing "but wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting.
As Shakespeare wrote in The Winters Tale: "I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting." That was in 1623, without the benefit of brain scans.
I love only that which they defend: the city of the Men of Numenor; and I would have her loved for her memory, her ancientry, her beauty, and her present wisdom." (Towers 355)
Shakespeare himself alludes to this age distinction when the Old Shepherd in The Winter's Tale bemoans that there even is such a thing as 'youths': 'I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting' (3.3.58-61).
And this reassures me that my perception of what has happened so disastrously, so hideously, in my own country is not merely the psychological product of embittered old age, in which the ancientry as a matter of course decry and deride youth as being nothing but the getting of wenches with child and stealing and fighting, but something more accurate and objective.
The King, Queen and Princess Margaret, in generous sunshine of a perfect spring day, saw all that the town has to show of ancientry. They received a royal welcome from the people of Warwickshire and in the evening watched a performance of Henry VIII by William Shakespeare.