and/or


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and/or

 (ănd′ôr′)
conj.
Used to indicate that either or both of the items connected by it are involved.
Usage Note: And/or is widely used in legal and business writing. Its use in general writing to mean "one or the other or both" is acceptable but often sounds stilted. See Usage Note at or1.

and/or

conj
(coordinating) used to join terms when either one or the other or both is indicated: passports and/or other means of identification.
Usage: Many people think that and/or is only acceptable in legal and commercial contexts. In other contexts, it is better to use or both: some alcoholics lose their jobs or their driving licences or both (not their jobs and/or their driving licences)

and/or

(ˈændˈɔr)

conj.
(used to imply that either or both of the things mentioned may be affected or involved): accident and/or health insurance.
[1850–55]
usage: and/or is used primarily in business and legal writing. Some object to its use in general writing, where it occasionally occurs: She spends her time entertaining and/or traveling. In such writing either and or or is usu. adequate. If a greater distinction is needed, another phrasing is available: entertaining or traveling, or both.