anecdotalism

anecdotalism

(ˌænɪkˈdəʊtəlɪzəm)
n
an inclination to relate anecdotes

anecdotalism

1. the writing or telling of short narratives concerning an interesting, amusing, or curious incident or event.
2. an excessive use of anecdotes, as sometimes in the conversation of the aged. — anecdotalist, n.
See also: Language Style
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Who, in our neo-romantic age of petty sociological anecdotalism, inquisitorial neo-historicist emendation, angry peripheral essentialism, and cool affective naturalism, really cares about the meaning of a Shakespeare play?
Beyond Comparative Anecdotalism: Lessons on Civil Society and Participation from Sao Paulo, Brazil.
(2.) My claim here is in the vein of Lena Cowen Orlin's argument in "A Case for Anecdotalism in Women's History: The Witness Who Spoke When the Cock Crowed," English Literary Renaissance, 31.
By systematically linking and organising multiple sources of data, CAQDAS can also aid in tackling the problem of anecdotalism or exampling that qualitative research is often accused of (Gephart 2004; Silverman 2005).
"Hanna Rosin's pop sociology work The End of Men, based on her cover story in The Atlantic magazine, is a frustrating blend of genuine insight and breezy, unconvincing anecdotalism. ...
So too, it seems, has the somewhat myopic art-historical anecdotalism that defined suites of works such as Gottessegen, at Galeric Riidiger Schottle in Munich in 2008, and the aforementioned "Objects in Relation." (In the Munich show, life-size wooden sculptures modeled after the gallerist and an influential local museum director greeted visitors on their entering the space; at the late, one of the relations referred to in the title was a romantic liaison between two key members of the prewar British avant-garde, namely Paul Nash and Eileen Agar.)
For a valid translation theory, one cannot rely on the promulgation of general principles on the basis of mere anecdotalism. But it would be true that there are no universally accepted principles of translation as lists of approved rules and techniques continue to appear for translation.
Selective anecdotalism is a weakness of debate over regulatory policy-an inescapable weakness because regulation operates by piecework (rulemaking involving widely varying issues and circumstances) and resists aggregation and generalization.
What it is, is a moving and tender critical memoir that lacks at times the hard edge of criticism but delivers on the memoir through a personal and reflective anecdotalism. Vonnegut, as constructed by Klinkowitz, is a very human, personable, and honorable individual, committed to pointing out the wrong turnings taken by society but equally aware of his own flaws and limitations.
This tentative claim gives a new and sharper sense to the expression "mental ears," because by this analysis we hear through (by means of) abstract representation, and also because we integrate the surface formalisms with explicit cognitive recognition of the underlying base forms: in each case we know by such hearing because the mere anecdotalism of sonic variety in speech sounds and phrasal accent-contours is brought into diagnostically understood formalization.
The first he called "anecdotalism" - meaning the ability of a few noisy or litigious people with a "sob story" to block government actions that are in the interest of everyone else.
With reference to a painting of a(n apparently disconnected, disembodied) pair of peasant shoes, Martin Heidegger, who in his own right as a philosopher would famously scoff at anecdotalism and historiographic details in his discussions of classical thinkers, argues principally that a work of art is not to be confused with a report about the process of making shoes.