anecdotal

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an·ec·dot·al

 (ăn′ĭk-dōt′l)
adj.
1. also an·ec·dot·ic (-dŏt′ĭk) or an·ec·dot·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) Of, characterized by, or full of anecdotes.
2. Based on casual observations or indications rather than rigorous or scientific analysis: "There are anecdotal reports of children poisoned by hot dogs roasted over a fire of the [oleander] stems" (C. Claiborne Ray).

an′ec·dot′al·ist n.
an′ec·dot′al·ly adv.

anecdotal

(ˌænɛkˈdəʊtəl)
adj
containing or consisting exclusively of anecdotes rather than connected discourse or research conducted under controlled conditions

an•ec•do•tal

(ˈæn ɪkˌdoʊt l, ˌæn ɪkˈdoʊt l)

adj.
1. pertaining to, resembling, or containing anecdotes.
2. based on incidental observations or reports rather than systematic evaluation.
[1830–40]
an`ec•do′tal•ism, n.
an`ec•do′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.anecdotal - having the character of an anecdote; "anecdotal evidence"
2.anecdotal - characterized by or given to telling anecdotes; "anecdotal conversation"; "an anecdotal history of jazz"; "he was at his anecdotic best"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

anecdotal

adjective unreliable, untrustworthy, based on rumour countless anecdotal reports
Translations

anecdotal

[ˌænɪkˈdəʊtəl] ADJanecdótico

anecdotal

[ˌænɪkˈdəʊtəl] adj
(= based on individual accounts) anecdotal evidence → témoignages m
There is anecdotal evidence that fewer trainees are being offered jobs once they qualify → Les témoignages rapportent que de moins en moins de stagiaires se voient offrir un emploi au terme de leur formation.
At first, the evidence was mainly anecdotal
BUT Dans un premier temps il ne s'agissait que de témoignages isolés.
(= full of anecdotes) [account, story] → anecdotique

anecdotal

anecdotal

[ænɪkˈdəʊtl] adjaneddotico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the disintegrationist Taylor (168) and the self-revisionist Vincent (392) notice that Sir William Lucy of Charlecote, thrice Sheriff of Warwickshire in the reign of Henry VI, was ancestor to the Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote, gentleman and sheriff of Warwickshire in the time of Shakespeare, alleged by Nicholas Rowe and other anecdotalists to have arrested Shakespeare for poaching deer in his park.
The inclusion of Howard Shore's urgent score to The Silence of the Lambs, however, would have certainly pleased anecdotalists.
Hotcher and his fellow anecdotalists aren't bothered by the steep prices, generally mediocre food (stick to the veal chop) and aggressively cost-conscious service (expect a personal visit from the proprietor if she feels you're not consuming enough to justify the space you're occupying).