lipoma

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li·po·ma

 (lĭ-pō′mə, lī-)
n. pl. li·po·ma·ta (-mə-tə) or li·po·mas
A benign tumor composed chiefly of fat cells.

li·pom′a·tous (-pŏm′ə-təs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lipoma

(lɪˈpəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a benign tumour composed of fatty tissue
[C19: New Latin]
lipomatous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

li•po•ma

(lɪˈpoʊ mə, laɪ-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
a benign tumor consisting of fat tissue.
[1820–30; < Greek líp(os) fat + -oma]
li•pom′a•tous (-ˈpɒm ə təs, -ˈpoʊ mə-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lipoma - a tumor consisting of fatty tissuelipoma - a tumor consisting of fatty tissue  
neoplasm, tumor, tumour - an abnormal new mass of tissue that serves no purpose
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

li·po·ma

n. lipoma, tumor de tejido adiposo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lipoma

n lipoma m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The painful tumor differential diagnosis has been described in the literature by the mnemonic "LEND AN EGG": leiomyoma, eccrine spiradenoma, neuroma, dermatofibroma, angiolipoma, neurilemmoma, endometrioma, glomus tumor, and granular cell tumor.
Primary variants of lipoma can be listed as angiolipoma, myolipoma, fibrolipoma, angiomyolipoma, myelolipoma, chondroid lipoma, chondrolipoma, fusiform cell, and pleomorphic lipoma.
Other variants of lipomas include neural fibrolipomas, intramuscular and intermuscular lipomas, angiolipoma, and spindle cell lipoma (1, 14).
Histologically, lipomas are classified as classic lipoma, fibrolipoma, intramuscular lipoma (IML), angiolipoma, and spindle cell lipoma.
Occasionally, lipomas may contain other types of mesenchymal tissue and such variants are named accordingly as fibrolipoma (connective tissue), angiolipoma (blood vessels), chondrolipoma (cartilage), and osteolipoma (bone).
Spinal lipomas have been broadly classified into five clinical entities lipomyelomeningocele, fatty filum, intradural spinal mass, epidural lipomatosis, and spinal angiolipoma. Among them, epidural lipomatosis usually occurs in obese people, patients with a history of corticosteroid use, and those with an endocrinopathy.[2] The Kovalevsky or neurenteric canal is defined as a canal connecting the neural tube and archenteron in the embryo, resulting from a persisting abnormal communication between the notochord and yolk sac and the amnion during an early stage of embryonic development.
In conclusion, what should be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of PEComa and renal angiolipoma is that these are tumors require close follow-up and good knowledge of pathological risk factors due to their malignancy potential following surgical excision since clinical behavior of these tumors is not precisely known.
Angiolipoma was delineated as a new entity in 1960 because of its different clinicopathologic features from those of regular lipoma.
Detailed antenatal anatomic survey using ultrasound ruled out angiolipoma of kidney and cerebral hamartoma.
Prominent amount of fat present in these lesions led previous authors to use the term infiltrating angiolipoma, suggesting that angiomatosis is probably best regarded as a more generalised mesenchymal proliferation.
Renal cystic disease, angiomyolipoma (renal angiolipoma), polycystic renal disease, and rarely, renal cell carcinoma are observed in 80% of pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis.