angle of refraction


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angle of refraction

n.
The angle formed by a refracted ray or wave and a line perpendicular to the refracting surface at the point of refraction.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

angle of refraction

n
(General Physics) the angle that a refracted beam of radiation makes with the normal to the surface between two media at the point of refraction
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an′gle of refrac′tion


n.
the angle between a refracted ray and a normal to the interface between two media at the point of refraction.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

angle of refraction

The angle formed by the path of refracted light or other radiation and a line drawn perpendicular to the refracting surface at the point where the refraction occurred. See more at wave.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.angle of refraction - the angle between a refracted ray and a line perpendicular to the surface between the two media at the point of refraction
angle - the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
It was fitted and filled with looking-glasses at every angle of refraction, so that they looked like the hundred facets of one huge diamond--if one could get inside a diamond.
Refraction is the change in direction that a light ray makes when it passes from one medium into another with a different density, such as from air to glass, with the angle of refraction proportional to the speed of light in a vacuum divided by the speed of light in, for example, glass.
Applying the Snell law to an air glass interface it is clear that the angle of refraction is more normal to the glass surface than the angle of incident.