Angles


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an·gle 1

 (ăng′gəl)
intr.v. an·gled, an·gling, an·gles
1. To fish with a hook and line.
2. To try to get something by indirect or artful means: angle for a promotion.
n. Obsolete
A fishhook or fishing tackle.

[Middle English anglen, from angel, fishhook, from Old English.]

an·gle 2

 (ăng′gəl)
n.
1. Mathematics
a. The figure formed by two lines diverging from a common point.
b. The figure formed by two planes diverging from a common line.
c. The rotation required to superimpose either of two such lines or planes on the other.
d. The space between such lines or surfaces.
e. A solid angle.
2. A sharp or projecting corner, as of a building.
3.
a. The place, position, or direction from which an object is presented to view: a building that looks impressive from any angle.
b. An aspect, as of a problem, seen from a specific point of view.
4. Slang A devious method; a scheme.
v. an·gled, an·gling, an·gles
v.tr.
1. To move or turn (something) at an angle: angled the chair toward the window.
2. Sports To hit (a ball or puck, for example) at an angle.
3. Informal To impart a biased aspect or point of view to: angled the story in a way that criticized the candidate.
v.intr.
To continue along or turn at an angle or by angles: The road angles sharply to the left. The path angled through the woods.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin angulus.]

An·gle

 (ăng′gəl)
n.
A member of a Germanic people that migrated to England from southern Jutland in the 5th century ad, founded the kingdoms of Northumbria, East Anglia, and Mercia, and together with the Jutes and Saxons formed the Anglo-Saxon peoples.

[From Latin Anglī, the Angles, of Germanic origin.]
Translations

Angles

[ˈæŋglz] NPLanglos mpl

Angles

pl (Hist) → Angeln pl
References in classic literature ?
The angles of a Square (and still more those of an equilateral Triangle), being much more pointed than those of a Pentagon, and the lines of inanimate objects (such as houses) being dimmer than the lines of Men and Women, it follows that there is no little danger lest the points of a square or triangular house residence might do serious injury to an inconsiderate or perhaps absent-minded traveller suddenly therefore, running against them: and as early as the eleventh century of our era, triangular houses were universally forbidden by Law, the only exceptions being fortifications, powder-magazines, barracks, and other state buildings, which it is not desirable that the general public should approach without circumspection.
But, about three centuries afterwards, the Law decided that in all towns containing a population above ten thousand, the angle of a Pentagon was the smallest house-angle that could be allowed consistently with the public safety.
At night, one could distinguish nothing of all that mass of buildings, except the black indentation of the roofs, unrolling their chain of acute angles round the place; for one of the radical differences between the cities of that time, and the cities of the present day, lay in the façades which looked upon the places and streets, and which were then gables.
Grant whatever instincts you please, and it seems at first quite inconceivable how they can make all the necessary angles and planes, or even perceive when they are correctly made.
After having stood a few minutes in the cavern, the atmosphere of which was rather warm than damp, Dantes' eye, habituated as it was to darkness, could pierce even to the remotest angles of the cavern, which was of granite that sparkled like diamonds.
The smoking-room projected at right angles from the wall of the house, in an oblong form--with a bow-window at the farther end, looking into the garden.
It was brown with age, weather-worn at the angles, spotted with moss and lichen.
The Angles, Saxons, and Jutes occupied territories in the region which includes parts of the present Holland, of Germany about the mouth of the Elbe, and of Denmark.
The object at his feet resolved itself into a dead horse, and at a right angle across the animal's neck lay a dead man, face upward in the moonlight.
But we withdrew at an acute angle not only because the French advanced between our two armies; the angle became still more acute and we withdrew still farther, because Barclay de Tolly was an unpopular foreigner disliked by Bagration (who would come his command), and Bagration- being in command of the second army- tried to postpone joining up and coming under Barclay's command as long as he could.
The term parallax proving "caviare to the general," they further explained that it meant the angle formed by the inclination of two straight lines drawn from either extremity of the earth's radius to the moon.
The clump of laurel in which the criminal lay was in the angle of a road which, after, ascending, southward, a steep acclivity to that point, turned sharply to the west, running along the summit for perhaps one hundred yards.