anima


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an·i·ma

 (ăn′ə-mə)
n.
1. The inner self of an individual; the soul.
2. In Jungian psychology:
a. The unconscious or true inner self of an individual, as opposed to the persona, or outer aspect of the personality.
b. The feminine inner personality, as present in the unconscious of the male. It is in contrast to the animus, which represents masculine characteristics.

[Latin; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

anima

(ˈænɪmə)
(in Jungian psychology) n
(Psychology)
a. the feminine principle as present in the male unconscious
b. the inner personality, which is in communication with the unconscious. See also animus
[Latin: air, breath, spirit, feminine of animus]

an•i•ma

(ˈæn ə mə)

n., pl. -mas.
1. soul; life.
2. (in the psychology of C. G. Jung)
a. the inner personality (contrasted with persona).
b. the feminine principle, esp. as present in men (contrasted with animus).
[1920–25; < Latin: breath, soul, spirit]

anima

, persona - Anima is Carl Jung's term for the inner part of the personality, or character, as opposed to the persona, or outer part.
See also related terms for personality.

anima

, animus - Anima is the source of the female part of personality and animus is the source of the male part.
See also related terms for personality.

anima

1. The spirit of the opposite sex within the subject (female in men, male in women).
2. female spirituality
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anima - (Jungian psychology) the inner self (not the external persona) that is in touch with the unconscious
self, ego - your consciousness of your own identity
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
Carl Gustav Jung, Carl Jung, Jung - Swiss psychologist (1875-1961)
Translations

anima

[ˈænɪmə] N (Psych) → ánima f, alma f

anima

n (Psych) → Anima f
References in classic literature ?
They are happy men, whose natures sort with their vocations; otherwise they may say, multum incola fuit anima mea; when they converse in those things, they do not affect.
It is necessary, however, to add that the experiments had hitherto been made in anima vili .
De Anima: Torstrik, 1862; Trendelenburg, 2nd edition, 1877, with English translation, E.
ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS OF ONE OR MORE WORKS: De Anima (with Parva Naturalia), by W.
Job represents the philosopher's stone, which must also be tried and martyrized in order to become perfect, as saith Raymond Lulle: Sub conservatione formoe speciftoe salva anima ."
Early in the morning we ascended the Sierra de las Animas. By the aid of the rising sun the scenery was almost picturesque.
Most of the animation for Anima's projects is done by homegrown artists, many of whom have been with the studio since its inception, and get training from key players in the business, including Asifa director Frank Gladstone, animator Raul Garcia ("Lion King"), animation-acting trainer Ed Hooks and visual effects director and supervisor Colin Brady ("The Hunger Games," "The Amazing Spider-Man").
xvi), although this description certainly fits some of them (there is also a lack of consistency in the form and structure of Averroes's short commentaries; see Druart's 1994 study, cited in the bibliography, where she muses whether Averroes had read the De anima carefully before writing the short commentary on it).
Based on the world of dreams, Anima explores the distorted dynamics between the conscious and subconscious, revealing the conflict and harmony within us all, disturbing, humorous, poetic and moving.
It's a performance that is by turns deeply disturbing, humorous and moving, as Anima takes the audience on a surreal, thought-provoking journey.
"The work is quite abstract but it gives people the chance to have their own interpretation."Anima is an exploration of the distorted world of the dreamer through an innovative combination of movement, dance, and theatre.
The present volume, which is the revised version of the author's PhD dissertation at the University of Berlin, deals, as the title indicates, with the reception of the Aristotelian De anima in the late Renaissance and early modern period.