annex

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an·nex

 (ə-nĕks′, ăn′ĕks′)
tr.v. an·nexed, an·nex·ing, an·nex·es
1. To append or attach, especially to a larger or more significant thing.
2. To incorporate (territory) into an existing political unit such as a country, state, county, or city.
3. To add or attach, as an attribute, condition, or consequence.
n. (ăn′ĕks′, ăn′ĭks)
1. A building added on to a larger one or an auxiliary building situated near a main one.
2. An addition, such as an appendix, that is made to a record or other document.

[Middle English annexen, from Old French annexer, from Latin annectere, annex-, to connect : ad-, ad- + nectere, to bind; see ned- in Indo-European roots.]

an′nex·a′tion (ăn′ĭk-sā′shən) n.
an′nex·a′tion·al adj.
an′nex·a′tion·ism n.
an′nex·a′tion·ist n.

annex

vb (tr)
1. to join or add, esp to something larger; attach
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to add (territory) by conquest or occupation
3. to add or append as a condition, warranty, etc
4. to appropriate without permission
n
a variant spelling (esp US) of annexe
[C14: from Medieval Latin annexāre, from Latin annectere to attach to, from nectere to join]
anˈnexable adj

an•nex

(v. əˈnɛks, ˈæn ɛks; n. ˈæn ɛks, -ɪks)
v.t.
1. to attach, append, or add, esp. to something larger or more important.
2. to incorporate (territory) into the domain of a city, country, or state: Germany annexed part of Czechoslovakia.
3. to take or appropriate, esp. without permission: planned to annex the private documents for their own use.
4. to attach as an attribute, condition, or consequence.
n.
5. something annexed.
6. a subsidiary building or an addition to a building.
7. something added to a document; appendix; supplement: an annex to a treaty.
Also, esp. Brit.,an′nexe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French annexer < Medieval Latin annexāre, derivative of Latin annexus, past participle of annectere, adnectere to attach]
an`nex•a′tion, n.

annex

A document appended to an operation order or other document to make it clearer or to give further details.

annex


Past participle: annexed
Gerund: annexing

Imperative
annex
annex
Present
I annex
you annex
he/she/it annexes
we annex
you annex
they annex
Preterite
I annexed
you annexed
he/she/it annexed
we annexed
you annexed
they annexed
Present Continuous
I am annexing
you are annexing
he/she/it is annexing
we are annexing
you are annexing
they are annexing
Present Perfect
I have annexed
you have annexed
he/she/it has annexed
we have annexed
you have annexed
they have annexed
Past Continuous
I was annexing
you were annexing
he/she/it was annexing
we were annexing
you were annexing
they were annexing
Past Perfect
I had annexed
you had annexed
he/she/it had annexed
we had annexed
you had annexed
they had annexed
Future
I will annex
you will annex
he/she/it will annex
we will annex
you will annex
they will annex
Future Perfect
I will have annexed
you will have annexed
he/she/it will have annexed
we will have annexed
you will have annexed
they will have annexed
Future Continuous
I will be annexing
you will be annexing
he/she/it will be annexing
we will be annexing
you will be annexing
they will be annexing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been annexing
you have been annexing
he/she/it has been annexing
we have been annexing
you have been annexing
they have been annexing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been annexing
you will have been annexing
he/she/it will have been annexing
we will have been annexing
you will have been annexing
they will have been annexing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been annexing
you had been annexing
he/she/it had been annexing
we had been annexing
you had been annexing
they had been annexing
Conditional
I would annex
you would annex
he/she/it would annex
we would annex
you would annex
they would annex
Past Conditional
I would have annexed
you would have annexed
he/she/it would have annexed
we would have annexed
you would have annexed
they would have annexed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.annex - an addition that extends a main building
addition, add-on, improver - a component that is added to something to improve it; "the addition of a bathroom was a major improvement"; "the addition of cinnamon improved the flavor"
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
ell - an extension at the end and at right angles to the main building
Verb1.annex - take (territory) as if by conquest; "Hitler annexed Lithuania"
take over, usurp, arrogate, seize, assume - seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession; "He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town"; "he usurped my rights"; "She seized control of the throne after her husband died"
colonise, colonize - settle as a colony; of countries in the developing world; "Europeans colonized Africa in the 17th century"
2.annex - attach to
append, add on, affix, supplement - add to the very end; "He appended a glossary to his novel where he used an invented language"

annex

verb
1. seize, take over, appropriate, acquire, occupy, conquer, expropriate, arrogate Rome annexed the Nabatean kingdom in 106 AD.
2. join, unite, add, connect, attach, tack, adjoin, fasten, affix, append, subjoin A gate goes through to the annexed garden.
join remove, separate, detach, disconnect, disengage, unfasten, disunite, disjoin

annex

verb
To add as a supplement or an appendix:
noun
A part added to a main structure:
Translations
مُلْحَق، مُلاحَق، مُلحَقَاتيَضُم، يُلْحِق
připojitpřístavekzabrat
anneksannektereindlemmetilbygning
lisa
aneksanektirati
annektálépületszárnyfüggelékhozzácsatol
innlimaviîbygging
aneksijaaneksuotipriestatasprijungti
anektētpiebūvepievienot
anektovaťprístavok
ekek binaele geçirmekmüştemilattopraklarına katmak

annex

[əˈneks]
A. VT
1. [+ territory] → anexar, anexionar (to a)
2. [+ document] → adjuntar, añadir (to a)
B. [ˈæneks] N (US) = annexe

annex

[ˈænɛks]
n = annexe
[əˈnɛks] vt [+ country, state, region, territory] → annexer
to annex sth to sth [+ country, territory] → annexer qch à qch

annex

n
(to document etc) → Anhang m, → Nachtrag m
(= building)Nebengebäude nt, → Annex m; (= extension)Anbau m

annex

[vb əˈnɛks; n ˈænɛks]
1. vt (territory) to annex (to)annettere (a)
2. n (Brit) (also annexe) → (edificio) annesso

annex

(əˈneks) verb
to take possession of (eg a country).
(ˈӕneks) (also ˈannexe)>noun
a building added to, or used as an addition to, another building. a hotel annexe.
ˌannexˈation (ӕ-) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Demands from PLO ranks that the organisation formally withdraw its recognition of Israel and campaign for a one-state solution are an ominous sign of what may be coming next - and play into the hands of the annexationists and colonists who dominate the most right-wing government in Israel's history.
annexationists att nis no cautiousnesses cue ass un fetishisations fin ess ta immaterialised ire mid ma labialisations lin ass ba multinationals mal uts li peneplanations pan ens na radialisations rin ass da renationalised roe end na semasiologists sot els mo annexationists en xi as cautiousnesses te is os fetishisations it si ho immaterialised al ti es labialisations it ai lo multinationals to in na peneplanations et pi lo radialisations it ai lo renationalised al ti is semasiologists ag si is
annexationists heightened the concerns of prospering white Creoles about Cuba's future.
13) Stevens immediately recognized the new government established by the annexationists under the leadership of provisional president Judge Stanford B.
On the one hand, pro-slavery annexationists viewed the island as an opportunity for expanding the United States' slave power.
He interpreted for Aguinaldo the larger implications of the split between the annexationists and the autonomists, on one hand, and the advocates of full independence, on the other.
29) Each time, annexationists introduced a joint resolution only after failing to secure enough votes to ratify a duly negotiated treaty.
Williams's much vaunted, bicultural Puerto Rican identity, which furnished him with a sentimental justification for attending MacLeish's conference, should come with the disclaimer that Williams belonged to a Puerto Rican intellectual tradition of annexationists, and this disposition colored his work as a cultural diplomat).
Annexationists believed that Puerto Rico should be incorporated as part of the United States.
Annexationists eyeing the Prairies and infiltrating Louis Riel's inner circle certainly led to a greater push for the continental railroad and the establishment of the paramilitary North-West Mounted Police, now the RCMP.
Cleveland withdrew the treaty and tried to find some way to repair the damage that the annexationists had done.
To recognize the ideological sleight of hand here, it is worth remembering that many annexationists desired to cede little agency to Cuba; whereas Cuba sought statehood and political self-determination, many annexationists--although not necessarily the Southerners who wanted more slave states--wished to make Cuba a territory without national self-representation.