annular eclipse

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Related to annular eclipses: Total solar eclipse

annular eclipse

n.
A solar eclipse in which the moon covers all but a bright ring around the circumference of the sun.

annular eclipse

n
(Astronomy) an eclipse of the sun in which the moon does not cover the entire disc of the sun, so that a ring of sunlight surrounds the shadow of the moon. Compare total eclipse, partial eclipse

an′nular eclipse′


n.
an eclipse of the sun in which a portion of its surface is visible as a ring surrounding the dark moon.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.annular eclipse - only a thin outer disk of the sun can be seenannular eclipse - only a thin outer disk of the sun can be seen
solar eclipse - the moon interrupts light from the sun
References in periodicals archive ?
In partial and annular eclipses only part of the Sun is obscured.
Annular eclipses are rare in Britain and anyone who missed the event yesterday will have to wait until 2093 for the next one.
Annular eclipses occur when the moon is too far from the earth to completely cover the sun.
Because both total and annular eclipses are only seen in their entirety when observed from directly under the path of the Moon's shadow.
Annular eclipses, which are considered far less important to astronomers than total eclipses of the sun, occur about 66 times a century and can only be viewed by people in the narrow band along its path.
The moons' silhouettes are so small that I'd call them "transits" rather than "annular eclipses," though to my knowledge nobody has defined a dividing line between the two terms.
In partial and annular eclipses, only part of the Sun is obscured.
Other papers included Richard McKim on 'Barker's Circle: a 1930's BAA lunar observing group'; Mohammed Mozafarri, on 'Historical Solar Annular Eclipses' (observed by astronomers from the middle-East during the mediaeval period); and our President, Bill Leatherbarrow, on 'The Amateur's Moon: British selenography and the BAA Lunar Section'.
In the ancient world the same word was used for both total and annular eclipses.
aAlthough annular eclipses can be quite interesting, they are nothing like a total eclipse,a says Espenak, who thinks that annular eclipses are only for die-hard eclipse-chasers.
Annular eclipses can last over three hours in locations where annularity is visible.
Such events are called annular eclipses, an allusion to the thin ring of dazzling sunlight that remains.