annunciation

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an·nun·ci·a·tion

 (ə-nŭn′sē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act of announcing.
2. An announcement; a proclamation.
3. Annunciation Christianity The angel Gabriel's announcement to the Virgin Mary of the Incarnation, observed as a feast on March 25.

Annunciation

(əˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. (Bible) the Annunciation New Testament the announcement of the Incarnation by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary (Luke 1:26–38)
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Also called: Annunciation Day the festival commemorating this, held on March 25 (Lady Day)

an•nun•ci•a•tion

(əˌnʌn siˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. (often cap.) the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary of her conception of Christ.
2. (cap.) Also called Lady Day. the church festival on March 25 in memory of this announcement.
3. an act or instance of announcing; proclamation.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.annunciation - a festival commemorating the announcement of the Incarnation by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin MaryAnnunciation - a festival commemorating the announcement of the Incarnation by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary; a quarter day in England, Wales, and Ireland
quarter day - a Christian holy day; one of four specified days when certain payments are due
Mar, March - the month following February and preceding April
2.annunciation - (Christianity) the announcement to the Virgin Mary by the angel Gabriel of the incarnation of ChristAnnunciation - (Christianity) the announcement to the Virgin Mary by the angel Gabriel of the incarnation of Christ
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
3.annunciation - a formal public statementannunciation - a formal public statement; "the government made an announcement about changes in the drug war"; "a declaration of independence"
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
edict - a formal or authoritative proclamation
promulgation - the official announcement of a new law or ordinance whereby the law or ordinance is put into effect

annunciation

noun
Translations

Annunciation

[əˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən] NAnunciación f

Annunciation

[əˌnʌnsiˈeɪʃən] nAnnonciation f

Annunciation

n (Bibl) → Mariä Verkündigung f; the feast of the Annunciationdas Fest Maria or Mariä Verkündigung

Annunciation

[əˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃn] n the Annunciationl'Annunciazione f
References in classic literature ?
During the period of doubt and apprehension which preceded the annunciation of this opinion, and of distress and agony which succeeded it, the family of Mr.
This annunciation excited great commotion among the different sectaries.
I could say that the Church of the Annunciation is a wilderness of beautiful columns, of statues, gilded moldings, and pictures almost countless, but that would give no one an entirely perfect idea of the thing, and so where is the use?
His figured panoply of death looked more like a disguise assumed in mockery than a fierce annunciation of a desire to carry destruction in his footsteps.
But this indication of his taste for good cheer, joined to the annunciation of his being a follower of the Court, who had lost himself at the great hunting-match, cannot induce the niggard Hermit to produce better fare than bread and cheese, for which his guest showed little appetite; and ``thin drink,'' which was even less acceptable.
A feather from the wing of the Angel of the Annunciation once
Where the sequence failed, as in the Annunciation, the Curator supplied it from his mound of books - French and German, with photographs and reproductions.
It's important to remember what Raymond Brown said about biblical annunciations.
Like two sides of the same coin, or a divine yin and yang, the Master of Tora painted these annunciations side by side.
An example is one of those renaissance Annunciations whose connection with the Villa Medici, Fiesole, for which it is the big illustration, is not explained.
If annunciations and negotiations are about communication and representation, the problems raised by those two activities affect, not only the arguments of the various authors studied here, but the rhetoric and authority of their own texts--an aspect that deserves more attention than it gets.
In a significant group of lifelike Annunciations the welcoming pose and gentle demeanor of the Madonna draw attention to her as a beautiful woman.