annunciatory


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an·nun·ci·a·tor

 (ə-nŭn′sē-ā′tər)
n.
One that announces, especially an electrical signaling device used in hotels or offices to indicate the sources of calls on a switchboard.

an·nun′ci·a·to′ry (-ə-tōr′ē) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.annunciatory - relating to the act of announcing or being announcedannunciatory - relating to the act of announcing or being announced
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References in periodicals archive ?
What I started to realize from my American vantage point, be it on a dirt road or urban boulevard, was that, in a closed, officious society from which the poet was undestandably estranged, the annunciatory inclinations of the self were both ridiculous and pathetic.
(30) As Frank Kermode writes in The Sense of An Ending, "fictions of epoch, of decadence and renovation" come parceled with terror and "annunciatory violence." (31) For Kermode, eschatology is nothing new even in times of war--each era defines and moves past its own imagined ends--but what is peculiar to the modern is the way that art takes on this vocabulary of Armageddon so that the relentless artistic commitment to the new and the revolutionary is felt as perpetual violence and schism.
By situating music as annunciatory of political economy, Attali is rejecting the economic determinism and reflection theory inherent in much critical cultural work.
The "Stork," a creature that is live, and lively, "even clipped," shows "black / and then white" feathers and in its movement reveals the holy that inhabits even this ungainly bird: "his feathers / are holy things" and his head movement becomes an "annunciatory gesture / pale as the angel's sleight of hand."
After an annunciatory prelude it launched into a minimalistically-textured toccata upon two tiny motifs built on fifths, sometimes coinciding, more often colliding, and demanding huge energy, stamina and concentration - which Trotter delivered in spades.