anopheles

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a·noph·e·les

 (ə-nŏf′ə-lēz′)
n.
Any of various mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles, which can carry the malaria parasite and transmit the disease to humans. Also called anopheles mosquito.

[New Latin Anōphelēs, genus name, from Greek anōphelēs, useless : an-, without; see a-1 + ophelos, advantage, use (influenced by earlier *nōphelēs, useless).]

a·noph′e·line′ (-līn′, -lĭn) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anopheles

(əˈnɒfɪˌliːz)
n, pl -les
(Animals) any of various mosquitoes constituting the genus Anopheles, some species of which transmit the malaria parasite to man
[C19: via New Latin from Greek anōphelēs useless, from an- + ōphelein to help, from ophelos help]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•noph•e•les

(əˈnɒf əˌliz)

n., pl. -les.
any of several mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles, certain species of which are vectors of the parasite causing malaria in humans.
[1895–1900; < New Latin < Greek anōphelḗs useless, hurtful, harmful =an- an-1 + -ophelēs, adj. derivative of óphelos profit]
a•noph′e•line` (-ˌlaɪn, -lɪn) adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·noph·e·les

(ə-nŏf′ə-lēz′)
Any of various mosquitoes that can transmit malaria to humans.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anopheles - malaria mosquitoesAnopheles - malaria mosquitoes; distinguished by the adult's head-downward stance and absence of breathing tubes in the larvae
arthropod genus - a genus of arthropods
anopheline - any mosquito of the genus Anopheles
malaria mosquito, malarial mosquito - transmits the malaria parasite
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

anopheles

n pl <-les>, anopheles mosquito (Zool) → Anopheles f, → Malariamücke f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In view of these findings, we conducted an entomologic and parasitologic survey in selected islands of Nicobar district to identify the role of anophelines in the transmission of P.
Community-based rice ecosystem management for suppressing vector anophelines in Sri Lanka.
Glucose Transporter in Anophelines. When searching for potential targets to develop a mosquito stage vaccine, receptors or transmembrane transporters are considered important molecules to interrupt malaria transmission by targeting parasite adhesion and/or invasion and/or maintenance in the mosquito tissues [28, 29].
Insecticide susceptibility status of some anophelines in district Bikaner Rajasthan.
Using two fossil calibration points (both at 34 Mya) mtDNA divergence times were estimated within a sympatric group of Anophelines of Pakistan.
This family includes three subfamilies viz., Culicinae (Culicines), Anophelinae (Anophelines) and Toxorhynchitinae (Service, 2008).
Immature forms were sampled in various bodies of water (habitats) in which, according to the literature, immature anophelines have previously known to be present (Miihlens et al.
(23.) Nagpal BN and Sharma VP (1995): Indian Anophelines, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co.
Diagne et al., "High annual and seasonal variations in malaria transmission by anophelines and vector species composition in Dielmo, a holoendemic area in Senegal," American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol.