anorectics


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Related to anorectics: orexigenic

anorectics

Used to reduce appetite. Most are potentially addictive and their use is now rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some cases, these products are sold as natural medicines, but many of them are associated with allopathic anorectics. The Porangaba (Cordia ecalyculata) and the Chapeu-de-Couro (Echinodorus grandiflorus) are two native plants whose raw extract are widely used for treatment of obesity, mainly in Brazil (da Silva and collaborators, 2010b).
This makes sense since anorectics are obsessed with looking thin, and employ systematic and compulsive rituals to accomplish such goals.
This nomenclature reflects that reality testing in anorectics, besides eating-related issues, is generally unimpaired, usually recognising their beliefs as unshared by others (2).
In this sense, anorectics' urge to disassociate themselves from their bodies or to transfigure into non-corporeal beings evinces the intimate relation between anorexia nervosa and the formation of identity.
In light of this cultural shift, it is noteworthy that many of Tennyson's female food-refusers display characteristics commonly attributed to Victorian fasting-girls and anorectics. Elaine, in particular, shares a number of traits with the emaciated women described in nineteenth-century newspaper reports and medical texts.
Anorectics have long represented a class of drugs coveted by all the involved competitors.
For example, you would check for erectile dysfunction (ED) drugs in men's virility products; glibenclamide and other anti-diabetic drugs in blood sugar sup port products; and laxatives, diuretics, anorectics and stimulants in weight loss products.
The UN's International Narcotics Control Board said the "slimming craze" was fuelling a dangerous demand for anorectics.
Nearly all anorectics are female, most are white, and most come from middle to upper-class families.
The case concerns the Commission's Decisions of March 2000, ordering the withdrawal of marketing authorisations of medicines containing certain anorectics, on the basis that they were not efficient in the long term.
Heather Munro Prescott's "Anorexia Nervosa," for example, summarizes the class, cultural, and ethnic assumptions about anorectics, and concludes that "the standard image of anorexia nervosa as a privileged white girl's disease is increasingly being called into question." (7) The essays in Part V approach the history of food regionally, often shifting the emphasis from the nutritional and medical to the cultural and historical.
Among the 22 who completed the program, severe relapses (a return to DSM-IV criteria for eating disorders) and partial relapses (significant eating problems) over 5 years were more common in binging and purging anorectics than in restrictors.