anosmia


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an·os·mi·a

 (ăn-ŏz′mē-ə)
n.
Loss of the sense of smell.

[New Latin : Greek an-, without; see a-1 + Greek osmē, odor.]

an·os′mic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anosmia

(ænˈɒzmɪə; -ˈɒs-)
n
(Pathology) pathol loss of the sense of smell, usually as the result of a lesion of the olfactory nerve, disease in another organ or part, or obstruction of the nasal passages
[C19: from New Latin, from an- + Greek osmē smell, from ozein to smell]
anosmatic, anˈosmic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•os•mi•a

(ænˈɒz mi ə, -ˈɒs-)

n.
absence or loss of the sense of smell.
[1805–15; < Greek an- an-1 + osm(ḗ) smell + -ia -ia]
an•os•mat•ic (ˌæn əzˈmæt ɪk) an•os′mic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

anosmia

Medicine. the absence of the sense of smell; olfactory anesthesia. Also called anosphrasia. — anosmic, adj.
See also: Odors
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anosmia - absence of the sense of smell (as by damage to olfactory nasal tissue or the olfactory nerve or by obstruction of the nasal passages)anosmia - absence of the sense of smell (as by damage to olfactory nasal tissue or the olfactory nerve or by obstruction of the nasal passages)
dysomia - impairment of the sense of smell
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

an·os·mi·a

[MIM*301700]
n. anosmia, falta de olfato.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
SMELL Anosmia, or losing your sense of smell, affects approximately five per cent of the population and can have a profound impact.
And the broadcaster, who has anosmia, meaning she has no sense of smell, said in a statement: "I have had a few pinch-me moments since I started at Radio 4 - my first Shipping Forecast, reading the news on the Today programme - but this beats them all.
Total loss is called anosmia. These changes may be temporary or permanent, depending on the cause.
There are many causes for Anosmia (the loss of smell):
Less common symptoms include Facial congestion (24%), Posterior nasal discharge (18%), Disturbance of smell (14%), Aural symptoms (11%) and Anosmia and Halitosis (1%).
Professor Philippe Froguel, chair of Genomic Medicine at Imperial, said: "Early studies into ADCY3 tested mice that were bred to lack that gene, found that these animals were obese and also lacked the ability to smell, known as anosmia. When we tested our patients, we found that they also had anosmia, again showing a link to mutations in ADCY3."
The child had no nasal obstruction, no epistaxis, no recurrent sinus infections, no anosmia nor hyposmia, and no snoring.
Adverse effects include a bad taste, nausea, and anosmia.
Since the embryonic migration of GnRH neurons from the nasal placode towards their final destination in the hypothalamus occurs in association with olfactory receptor neurons, the resulting phenotype includes anosmia in addition to HH.
It's hard to imagine the combination of blindness, anosmia (paint has a distinctive smell), and plain ignorance and stupidity that would allow that question to be asked.
Despite being non-significant, depressive symptoms (50.8%), anosmia (44.4%), decreased libido/sexual functions (39.7%), recognition of tremor by others (39.7%), and micrographia (25.4%) were more common in Group l; meanwhile, bradykinesia (89.2%), pain-cramp (70.3%), slow gait (70.3%), EDS (64.9%), constipation (56.8%), REM sleep behavior disorder (54.1%), frequent voiding/incontinence (54.1%), polypharmacy (45.9%), hyperhidrosis (43.2%), spasm (43.2%), and restless legs syndrome (37.8%) were more common in Group 2 (Table 2).