anoxia


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an·ox·i·a

 (ăn-ŏk′sē-ə)
n.
1. Absence of oxygen.
2. A pathological deficiency of oxygen, especially hypoxia.

[an- + ox(o)- + -ia.]

an·ox′ic (-ŏk′sĭk) adj.

anoxia

(ænˈɒksɪə)
n
1. lack or absence of oxygen
2. (Pathology) a deficiency of oxygen in tissues and organs. Compare hypoxia
[C20: from an- + ox(ygen) + -ia]
anˈoxic adj

an•ox•i•a

(ænˈɒk si ə, əˈnɒk-)

n.
1. lack of oxygen, as in suffocation.
[1930–35; an-1 + ox (ygen) + -ia]
an•ox′ic, adj.

anoxia

a condition charaeterized by insufficient oxygen in the tissues.
See also: Disease and Illness

anoxia

Lack of oxygen, often caused by an obstruction to the blood supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anoxia - severe hypoxiaanoxia - severe hypoxia; absence of oxygen in inspired gases or in arterial blood or in the tissues
hypoxia - oxygen deficiency causing a very strong drive to correct the deficiency
anemic anoxia - anoxia resulting from a decreased concentration of hemoglobin
anoxic anoxia - anoxia resulting from defective oxygenation of the blood in the lungs
ischemic anoxia, stagnant anoxia - anoxia resulting from slow peripheral circulation (such as follows congestive cardiac failure)
Translations

anoxia

[əˈnɒksɪə] Nanoxia f

an·ox·i·a

n. anoxia, ausencia de oxígeno en los tejidos;
altitude ______ de altitud;
anemic ______ anémica;
neonatorum ______ del nenonato;
stagnant ______ de estancamiento.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use a supplemental heat source that would ensure they are not burnt or don't die due to anoxia.
The transport of the objects takes place in dependence of the procedures of the transfer of the exhibition architecture in the huf, The arthandlingablufe both in dahlem (preparation) and in the huf (installation / assembly) as well as the preparatory measures in dahlem (restoration, Packaging, Anoxia treatment).
Erich Schmutzhard defined neurocritical care as the intensive care management of patients with life-threatening neurological and neurosurgical illnesses like severe stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, severe traumatic brain injury, acute cerebral hypoxia and anoxia, life threatening infectious and inflammatory diseases of the nervous system to technical issues like intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure.
Finally, myocardial ischemia and anoxia will lead to damage of cardiac muscles.5-7 Myocardial cell damage can reduce cardiac pump function.
Individual of any age; has experienced a severe neurological insult (post-resuscitation, cerebral anoxia, CVA, cerebral haemorrhage, encephalopathy, traumatic brain injury and a Glasgow score of
Inducing an animal CP model that combines prenatal exposure of rats to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), perinatal anoxia and post-natal sensorimotor restriction produced muscular atrophy in the anterior tibialis and soleus muscles, the transition from type I to type II fibers and changes in the motor skills of the animals (Stigger et al., 2011).
Soon after, Facino experienced "cardiac arrest, which led to diffuse brain anoxia (lack of oxygen to the brain), brain swelling and subsequent death."
This impact of bioturbation on global biogeochemistry likely affected animal evolution through expanded ocean anoxia, high atmospheric CO2 levels and global warming and possibly contributed to a number of mass extinction events.
The coroner accepted his medical cause of death as cerebral anoxia due to hanging, and noted there was sufficient MDMA and anti-depressant in his system to potentially affect his behaviour.
The bad: if the newborn continues to remain apneic (as in secondary apnea) and no amount of stimulation works, then the next appropriate step is to initiate PPV immediately to avoid the danger of prolonging anoxia. As a general rule, the longer a baby has been in secondary apnea, the longer it will take for spontaneous breathing to resume.
Hibernation in freshwater turtles: softshell turtles (Apalone spinifera) are the most intolerant of anoxia among North American species.
Of relevance also are the energetic mechanisms of low-oxygen tolerant species, such as the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana, whose quiescent embryos respond to long-term anoxia through down-regulation of metabolic processes and cessation of the transcription of mitochondrial proteins (Kwast & Hand 1996.