antecedence


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Related to antecedence: conferred, hold off, look into, prospectively

antecedence

the act of going before; precedence
Not to be confused with:
antecedents – ancestors; forerunners; the history, events, and characteristics of one’s earlier life
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

an·te·ce·dence

 (ăn′tĭ-sēd′ns)
n.
Precedence.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antecedence

(ˌæntɪˈsiːdəns)
n
1. precedence; priority
2. (Astronomy) astronomy retrograde motion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•te•ced•ence

(ˌæn təˈsid ns)

n.
1. the act or fact of going before; precedence.
2. priority.
[1525–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antecedence - preceding in time
earliness - quality of coming early or earlier in time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

antecedence

noun
The act, condition, or right of preceding:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The third, to conduct my thoughts in such order that, by commencing with objects the simplest and easiest to know, I might ascend by little and little, and, as it were, step by step, to the knowledge of the more complex; assigning in thought a certain order even to those objects which in their own nature do not stand in a relation of antecedence and sequence.
Jibrin supported the aspiration of the current Speaker and was promptly offered the position of the Director General of the Campaign in recognition of his knack for political dexterity, hard work and antecedence of success.
He wrote that metapsychics had shown the existence of levels of thought which indicated the "antecedence of a dynamic spiritual principle as a permanent root of the Individual and an unchanging axis of the evolutionary process of the being" (Santa Cara, n.d., p.
* The epidemiological criteria used to define causality are: antecedence in time, strength of association, consistency of findings, and biological plausibility (of a risk factor with respect to disease);
Extraordinarily, paleontologists have recently found evidence in Morocco that the earliest members of modern humans date back 300,000 years, replacing the evidence for an antecedence of just 175,000 years.
Accordingly, of the three Greek-Ottoman disputes, only the 1914 dispute might have a relationship of precedence or antecedence with variation in the severity dynamics of relevant major power rivalries.
And so, when we figure as part of someone's antecedence, we are invariably there along with innumerable others, indeed more people for attention than can be fitted into any manageable agenda.
What lies in the antecedence? Very hard realities are those, indeed.
If that is so, then why did he give an extension in service and take into his fold Mahanama with such a putrid antecedence?
But why should one undertake such a laborious task for the purpose of self-gratification about historical antecedence and relatedness?
Secondly, the current study is improving our knowledge on a strategic antecedence for enhancing a teamwork efficacy.