antetype

antetype

(ˈæntɪˌtaɪp)
n
an earlier form; prototype
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
(26) Indeed, the Messianic ideal was "an antetype of American republican independence." (27) Professor D.
A Midsummer Night's Dream is a familiar antetype; bedroom farce helps populate the subgenre.
In so doing he "elevates the sex relationship from type to antetype" while "undoubtedly thinking of the simultaneous realization of both aspects in the relationship between Christ [bridegroom] and the Church [bride]" (ibid, 147-48).
Faulkner constructs another "foreigner" on the hybrid antetype of Christ in the character of the corporal in A Fable.
Part B, on the other hand, stood by itself as an account of the creation of the cosmos by the antetype of the creator God of Genesis, androgynous Immortal Man.
The most important one is the topic of the 'woman as creator.' Just as Emily, whose name refers to the writer Emily Bronte, is a writer too, Ulrike Maria Stuart is writing, similar to one of her antetypes, the journalist and later terrorist Ulrike Meinhof.
Just as Christians were taught to see in the Old Testament antetypes of the Revelation contained in the New Testament, so Yonge's readers are led to the recognition of a system of analogies which cannot be fully appreciated until the novel's outcome is known.