anthology

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an·thol·o·gy

 (ăn-thŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. an·thol·o·gies
1. A collection of literary pieces, such as poems, short stories, or plays.
2. A miscellany, assortment, or catalog, as of complaints, comments, or ideas: "The Irish love their constitution for what it is: an anthology of the clerical-nationalist ideas of 1936" (Economist).

[Medieval Greek anthologiā, collection of epigrams, from Greek, flower gathering, from anthologein, to gather flowers : antho-, antho- + logos, a gathering (from legein, to gather; see leg- in Indo-European roots).]

an′tho·log′i·cal (ăn′thə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

anthology

(ænˈθɒlədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a collection of literary passages or works, esp poems, by various authors
2. any printed collection of literary pieces, songs, works of art, etc
[C17: from Medieval Latin anthologia, from Greek, literally: a flower gathering, from anthos flower + legein to collect]
anthological adj
anˈthologist n

an•thol•o•gy

(ænˈθɒl ə dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a book or other collection of selected writings, often in the same literary form, of the same period, or on the same subject.
2. any collection of selected works, as songs, paintings, etc.
[1630–40; < Latin anthologia < Greek: literally, gathering of flowers. See antho-, -logy]
an•tho•log•i•cal (ˌæn θəˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.

anthology

a collection of prayers used for solemn feasts in the Orthodox Eastern Church. See also books.
See also: Christianity
a collection of stories, poems, or other literary material. See also christianity. — anthologist, n.
See also: Literature
a collection of writings by various authors. — anthologist, n.
See also: Collections and Collecting

Anthology

 a collection of flowers; items culled from literature. See also garland, treasury.
Examples: anthology of causes and effects, 1878; of epigrams; of flowers, 1755; of hymns, 1775; of poems; of pros’ [‘prostitutes’]—Lipton, 1970; of prose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthology - a collection of selected literary passagesanthology - a collection of selected literary passages
compendium, collection - a publication containing a variety of works
diwan, divan - a collection of Persian or Arabic poems (usually by one author)
florilegium, miscellany, garland - an anthology of short literary pieces and poems and ballads etc.
omnibus - an anthology of articles on a related subject or an anthology of the works of a single author

anthology

Translations
antologie
antologitekstsamling
antologija
antológia
safnrit
antologija
antoloģija
antolojigüldeste

anthology

[ænˈθɒlədʒɪ] Nantología f

anthology

[ænˈθɒlədʒi] n [poetry, stories, writings] → anthologie f

anthology

nAnthologie f

anthology

[ænˈθɒlədʒɪ] nantologia

anthology

(ӕnˈθolədʒi) plural anˈthologies noun
a collection of pieces of poetry or prose. an anthology of love poems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike other anthologists Miller does not place these song lyrics in a separate section; indeed he eschews both genre categorization and chronology, organizing this book thematically in sections titled "Freedom," "Celebration of Blackness," "Love Poems," "Family Gatherings," "Healing Poems," "Rituals: Music, Dance and Sports," and "American Journal" (which, devoted entirely to Robert Hayden's magnificent long poem of the same title, functions as an epilogue).
Unlike a surprisingly large number of anthologists of modern Chinese literature, he has responsibly taken the trouble to consult pre-1949 editions in order to restore post-1949 deletions of politically incorrect passages while excising latter-day ideological additions and assorted bowdlerisms.
(As with Williams, anthologists who opt for the "easy" poems give an unrepresentative picture.) Like Williams, O'Hara wrote about American culture from the most democratic of perspectives, aided, however, by the generous humor of camp, as in his praise of "greatness,/whether it be of Michelangelo or of Bebe Daniels." Like Williams too, he was the maker of possibilities that turn simplistic or tedious in the work of others, notably the "I do this I do that" poem, which for O'Hara was always a poem of self-performance, hardly an artlessly literal transcription of what he "did."
Furthermore, The Columbia Anthology is quite up-to-date, including works as recent as Han Shaogong's story "The Leader's Demise" (1992), as well as a story by Shi Zhecun, a fine but politically heterodox Shanghai writer of the 1930s whom literary historians and anthologists had almost entirely ignored for many decades until his rediscovery in the 1980s.
It is exceptional for its scope, bringing together information about poets from the eastern portion of the Arabophone world in the eleventh century, as well as for its influence: the pattern of biographical anthologies that it inaugurated would be productively adopted by anthologists in subsequent centuries.
All anthologists should be so lucky: "Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to gather the best erotic work by top female poets." Off Enid Shomer went, wherever the trail led -- to poems by Denise Levertov, Sharon Olds, Erica Jong, Anne Sexton, Nikki Giovanni, and Audre Lorde, in addition to Shomer's own stellar work.
Esiri offers a good selection of poets of the past, such as Blake, Stevenson, Rossetti and De la Mare and she has a decent representation of women, something many anthologists fail to achieve.
Wetlands anthologists showed attractive pictures and video clips of the Okavango Delta, hence advertising the destination.
Anthologies bearing the distinct taste of the anthologists are preferable, in my view, to compilations whose editors pretend to be pluralistic in their picks.
Who, among Beat scholars and anthologists, has been as much there as she?
More crucially, Canadian anthologists themselves, argues Lecker, figure themselves, intentionally or not, "as culture keepers, as secular agents vested with the responsibility of transmitting national archetypes and tropes" (11).
Yet, Spanish anthologists in the second half of the twentieth century are also highly indebted to Manent's Romanticos y Victorianos, which made of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron and Keats enduring figures just when the first anthologies of English poetry had fallen into oblivion.