anthracite


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an·thra·cite

 (ăn′thrə-sīt′)
n.
A dense, shiny coal that has a high carbon content and little volatile matter and burns with a clean flame. Also called hard coal.

[Probably ultimately from Greek anthrakitis, a kind of coal, from anthrax, anthrak-, charcoal.]

an′thra·cit′ic (-sĭt′ĭk) adj.

anthracite

(ˈænθrəˌsaɪt)
n
(Geological Science) a hard jet-black coal that burns slowly with a nonluminous flame giving out intense heat. Fixed carbon content: 86–98 per cent; calorific value: 3.14 × 107–3.63 × 107 J/kg. Also called: hard coal
[C19: from Latin anthracītes type of bloodstone, from Greek anthrakitēs coal-like, from anthrax coal, anthrax]
anthracitic adj

an•thra•cite

(ˈæn θrəˌsaɪt)

n.
a hard coal low in volatile hydrocarbons and burning with little smoke or flame.
[1810–15; probably < French < Latin (Pliny) anthracītis kind of coal. See anthracene, -ite1]
an`thra•cit′ic (-ˈsɪt ɪk) an′thra•cit`ous (-ˌsaɪ təs) adj.

an·thra·cite

(ăn′thrə-sīt′)
A hard, shiny coal that has a high carbon content. It is valued as a fuel because it burns with a clean flame and without smoke or odor, but it is much less abundant than bituminous coal. Compare bituminous coal, lignite.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthracite - a hard natural coal that burns slowly and gives intense heat
coal - fossil fuel consisting of carbonized vegetable matter deposited in the Carboniferous period
Translations
فَحْم صَلْب، فَحْم أنْثراسيت
antracit
antrasit
antracit
antracit
harîkol
antracitas
antracīts
antracit
antrasit

anthracite

[ˈænθrəsaɪt] Nantracita f

anthracite

[ˈænθrəsaɪt] nanthracite m

anthracite

nAnthrazit m

anthracite

[ˈænθrəsaɪt] nantracite f

anthracite

(ˈӕnθrəsait) noun
a kind of very hard coal that burns almost without any smoke or flames.
References in classic literature ?
Glancing at the looking-glass, we behold -- deep within its haunted verge -- the smouldering glow of the half-extinguished anthracite, the white moon-beams on the floor, and a repetition of all the gleam and shadow of the picture, with one remove further from the actual, and nearer to the imaginative.
On entering the bar-room, I found, as I expected, the old tradition monger seated by a special good fire of anthracite, compelling clouds of smoke from a corpulent cigar.
Grandfather loved a wood-fire far better than a grate of glowing anthracite, or than the dull heat of an invisible furnace, which seems to think that it has done its duty in merely warming the house.
Such is the Burning Mountain, on Powder River, abounding with anthracite coal.
A Heidenberg stove, filled to the brim with intensely burning anthracite, was sending a bright gleam through the isinglass of its iron door, and causing the vase of water on its top to fume and bubble with excitement.
Instead of feeling a poverty when we encounter a great man, let us treat the new comer like a travelling geologist who passes through our estate and shows us good slate, or limestone, or anthracite, in our brush pasture.
Its vivid yellows fairly screamed aloud; its whites were as eider down; its blacks glossy as the finest anthracite coal, and its coat long and shaggy as a mountain goat.
There are immense anthracite coal-fields at the head of the gulf not far from Sari, and the railway will tap these.
The newspapers, in 1902 of that era, credited the president of the Anthracite Coal Trust, George F.
In the centre of the carriage there is usually a stove, fed with charcoal or anthracite coal; which is for the most part red-hot.
In contrast, the anthracite coal found in the western part of the South Wales coalfield could not be used for smelting iron.
5 million tonnes and its anthracite production stood at 2.