anthracosis

(redirected from anthracotic)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

an·thra·co·sis

 (ăn′thrə-kō′sĭs)
[New Latin : Greek anthrax, anthrak-, charcoal + -osis.]

anthracosis

(ˌænθrəˈkəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) a lung disease due to inhalation of coal dust. Informal name: coal miner's lung

anthracosis

a disease of coal miners caused by the inhalation of coal dust.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthracosis - lung disease caused by inhaling coal dust
pneumoconiosis, pneumonoconiosis - chronic respiratory disease caused by inhaling metallic or mineral particles
Translations

an·thra·co·sis

n. antracosis, condición pulmonar causada por la inhalación prolongada de polvo de carbón.

anthracosis

n antracosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Granulomas are composed of macrophages and do not typically contain granulocytes; they are also white to pale pink if not associated with other pigments (hemosiderin, anthracotic pigment).
A relationship between dark anthracotic pigmentation in the bronchial mucosa and tuberculosis has been demonstrated.
Fifteen lymph nodes were taken and the results showed histiocytic infiltration in sinusoid area and anthracotic pigment deposition.
Most patients with anthracotic bronchitis are elderly women who typically present with chronic cough, sputum and dyspnoea.
Anthracotic pigmentation in the bronchial mucosa is a bronchoscopic finding of pneumoconiosis, or evidence of heavy atmospheric soot.
According to the past case-series studies in Iran, in addition to these factors, indoor smoke exposure due to oven based traditional baking is found to be common among anthracotic cases.
Adults chronically exposed to biomass fuel smoke show the presence of multiple dark anthracotic pigmentations in the large airway mucosa,21 mainly due to deposition of carbon particles, iron, lead, cadmium, silica, phenol, hydrocarbon complexes, and other inorganic and organic substances in the respiratory tract mucosa.
We have recently encountered an increasing number of patients where dark anthracotic pigmentation was not associated with environmental exposure to coal dust or smoking.
For example, lung cancer is still considered by epidemiologists as a single entity, but clinicians are aware that in addition to cancer occurring in an anthracotic lung, pulmonary cancers may also occur in nonanthracotic lungs; this is a different disease less likely to be dependent on air pollution.