anthrop


Also found in: Acronyms.

anthrop-

(word root) human being
Examples of words with the root anthrop-: anthropomorphism

anthrop.

1. anthropological.
2. anthropology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Journal of Anthrop Med, 1992, 9, 2, 1-14; with permission: Phycicians' Association for Anthroposophical Medicine)
He also said that I would like to mention the fact that not for years rather for decades, not only the French scholars had worked in Balochistan, but also the French geologists, French archaeologists, French anthrop lists and historians have worked in the province even in the Bugti areas.
A review and a preliminary test of the 'grandmother hypothesis' in Tokugawa Japan [abstract] Am/Phys Anthrop. September 2002; 119(1):67-76.
(5) The word parts in the prefix, suffix, and roots lessons included the following: prefixes: un, re, in/im, dis, a/an, de, en/em, e/ex, ad, inter; suffixes: y, ty/ity, age, ist, tion/ion, ance/ence, able/ible, al/ial, er/or; roots: bene, co/con/com/cor, mal/male, dic/dict, path, mort, port, fac/fact/fit, mit/mis/miss, anthrop, morph, tort.
"The economic problems involved in delivering hydrogen to fuel cells are difficult to remedy because they stem from fundamental thermodynamics," Professor Anthrop contends.
Sage and Loudermilk (1979) found that although women competing in more gender-inappropriate sports may not themselves perceive more role conflict, there is evidence that they will experience more role conflict (but see Anthrop & Allison, 1983).
Day 5: Education in America Day 6 & 7: American Business Ideas Day 8 & 9: Teenage Affairs in America Day 10: Chinese History & Anthrop. Day 11: Chinese Popular culture Day 12: Chinese Scholars & Scientists Day 13: American Scholars' Personal & Professional Profiles Day 14: Chinese Economy Table 2 Perceived Influence of Topic on Learner and Learner Willingness Context Learners Topic Selected & Time Spent Willingness (in mins.) to Student participate (Graduate a.
Snyder 1988; Allison and Butler, 1984; Anthrop and Allison, 1983; Sage and Loudermilk, 1979; Lance, 1987; Stein and Hoffman, 1978; Coakley, 2001; Sage, 1979), it has been maintained that varsity university student-athletes often have difficulty coping with the roles associated with their statuses as athletes and students (Stein and Hoffman, 1978; Coakley, 2001; Sage, 1979).
I examine the contested meanings of "field" and "genre" in anthrop ology and provide a feminist reading of the different lenses with which Himalayan culture is imagined and represented.