anthropic principle


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anthropic principle

n.
Any of various hypotheses in theoretical physics asserting that human existence and the ability to observe the universe are necessary rather than contingent facts about the universe and must be considered when interpreting or theoretically constraining fundamental physical laws.

anthropic principle

n
(Astronomy) astronomy the cosmological theory that the presence of life in the universe limits the ways in which the very early universe could have evolved
References in periodicals archive ?
Supporters of the anthropic principle infer from the vast improbability of a world in which humans can develop that it must have been created.
The former is the author's rather tendentious account of some of the latest speculations in theoretical physics - notably "the Anthropic Principle," a view held by a Cambridge cosmologist who argues that the cosmos is not random in its origin, as has been thought, but contains certain "mysterious coincidences" that may, and indeed should, be interpreted as constituting a telos for humankind's existence.
The Anthropic Principle suggests that the universe was expressly built for humans, and the Gala Hypothesis portrays the world around us as a living Earth Mother.
Philosophers of all persuasions will have a lot to learn by reading this book, not only about a philosophical programme, but also about the current debates concerning some hot philosophical issues such as the problem of consciousness, the anthropic principle and evolutionary epistemology.
Carter [1983] construes the anthropic principle as having to do with the restrictions that the existence of human beings places on the observable features of the universe.
Likewise, the anthropic principle is thought to be guided, not directed, by the God of process theology, even though the form of this guidance is not given.
Science and religion in Anthropic principle universe?
In this brief letter, originally addressed to Torah scholars, we demonstrate how Zelmanov's Anthropic Principle is consistent with this tradition by analyzing the famous question in philosophy, "If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?
This is called the Anthropic Principle and has many people believing there must be some intelligence controlling everything.
After reviewing the many improbable coincidences of the universe described by the Anthropic Principle, Professor Levi reasons, "The anthropic principle by itself is of course not an explanation--it simply helps us group the coincidences.
This idea is termed the anthropic principle, and it applies to any situation in which the value of a physical constant or other fundamental quantity, if changed even a few percent, would preclude life.
Part 4 discusses various interpretations of coincidences in the universe that have led to an anthropic principle.