anthropic principle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

anthropic principle

n.
Any of various hypotheses in theoretical physics asserting that human existence and the ability to observe the universe are necessary rather than contingent facts about the universe and must be considered when interpreting or theoretically constraining fundamental physical laws.

anthropic principle

n
(Astronomy) astronomy the cosmological theory that the presence of life in the universe limits the ways in which the very early universe could have evolved
References in periodicals archive ?
Abraham Zelmanov's profundity "sine qua non" is reflected in the singular creation of the theories of chronometric, kinemetric, and orthometric (monad) formalism in General Relativity, the Infinite Relativity Principle, the Anthropic Principle, the extensive classification of all possible cosmological models in the space-time of General Relativity (the Zelmanov Classification, including the possibility of absolute reference frames in a deforming, rotating, gravitating closed finite Universe), and many others (see the website of The Abraham Zelmanov Journal for details, and in particular the 2012 foreword to the book Particles Here and Beyond the Mirror).
But final causality has become prominent recently with the growing awareness of the anthropic principle, which states that the universe is fine-tuned for life and that were any laws or initial conditions even slightly different, life could not have arisen.
for us, which is called the Anthropic principle, weak (WAP) or strong
While some have argued for an anthropic principle that would render improbable the emergence of life and intelligent life on other planets, Thomas O'Meara argues, based on probability and given the expanse of the universe, that conditions for other habitable planets with advanced beings is quite high, perhaps "one in every four hundred thousand star systems" (10).
Attention is also given to the anthropic principle, where a number of fascinating, apparent coincidences about the natural world that have puzzled scientists, philosophers, and theologians alike are discussed.
However, the much feared and loathed anthropic principle can provide an escape from the discomfort.
I suspect that this was written at the request of the series editor, professor of philosophy Simon Blackburn, and Stuart Clark does his admirable best with it, introducing concepts from quantum mechanics (and Einstein's famous epigram 'God does not play dice') as well as the anthropic principle, while all the time skirting round the fact that the answer to this question is relatively straightforward: no
Four introductory essays cover aspects of the science and religion dialogue, but the bulk of the book is an alphabetical encyclopedia that contains entries on everything from the anthropic principle to Intelligent Design to wave-particle duality.
Individual entries are sometimes tendentious, however; the entry on the anthropic principle ends with a profession of atheism that, whatever its merits, is not a consequence of the entry's discussion.
It's a notion generally known as the anthropic principle, and it evokes intransigent opposition from those who condemn it and unflagging enthusiasm from those who espouse it.
Finally, he classifies both sociobiology and work relating to the anthropic principle in cosmology as borderline examples of pseudoscience.
The anthropic principle presents a great opportunity for discussion of areas of agreement.