anthropogony


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anthropogony

(ˌænθrəˈpɒɡənɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the origin of the human species
References in periodicals archive ?
I question whether the Christian Academy is adequately preparing ministry leaders for our new understanding of anthropogony: as a student attending a divinity school, I still regularly witness discussions which are based on theological presuppositions that no longer comport with many well-documented, repeatable, and testable facts.
This is because this makes present and active anthropogony [...] the patient back to health: he feels in his inner process essential emersion.
(90) Anaximander found this image attractive enough to use it for his zoogony and, in a somewhat altered form, his anthropogony. (91) Anaximander's affinity for images, similes, and puns led Theophrastus, according to Simplicius, to refer to his words as "quite poetic" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Adam's Dust and Adam's Glory in the Hodayot and the Letters of Paul: Rethinking Anthropogony and Theology