anthropological


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an·thro·pol·o·gy

 (ăn′thrə-pŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The scientific study of the origin, the behavior, and the physical, social, and cultural development of humans.
2. That part of Christian theology concerning the genesis, nature, and future of humans, especially as contrasted with the nature of God: "changing the church's anthropology to include more positive images of women" (Priscilla Hart).

an′thro·po·log′i·cal (-pə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), an′thro·po·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
an′thro·po·log′i·cal·ly adv.
an′thro·pol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.anthropological - of or concerned with the science of anthropologyanthropological - of or concerned with the science of anthropology; "anthropological studies"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
خاص بِعِلْم الإنْسان
antropologický
embertani
mannfræîilegur
antropologický
insanbilimsel

anthropological

[ˌænθrəpəˈlɒdʒikəl] ADJantropológico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

anthropological

[ˌænθrəpəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] adjanthropologique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

anthropological

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

anthropological

[ˌænθrəpəˈlɒdʒɪkl] adjantropologico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

anthropology

(ӕnθrəˈpolədʒi) noun
the study of human society, customs, beliefs etc.
anthropoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ˌanthroˈpologist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
A cast of your skull, sir, until the original is available, would be an ornament to any anthropological museum.
The study is then completed by a much more anthropological fourth chapter that examines the place and role of youths, the deceased, masks, and executions in the context of the Carnival/Lent season.
Anthropological Literature will be updated quarterly with approximately 2000 new citations.
Finally, a seam of anthropological scholarship on burial practices offers exquisitely detailed portraits of bereavement at the household and community level.
They are intended as windows to the research process that would enable readers to accompany her on the anthropological quest.
This reflection is interwoven with a critical examination of many written works and their authors, of the postmodernist influence on fieldwork, of social change and development, of the limits of anthropological understanding, of psychoanalysis and sociobiology, as well as of himself as a `born eclectic' who is happiest with ethnography and hypotheses deriving from ethnographic comparison.
Revisions to the American Anthropological AssociationAEs code of ethics over a three year period serve as an extended example of the challenges of applying ethical principles in the social sciences research.
Among the topics are the ontogeny of an anthropological epistemology in 18th-century Scotland, changing modern institutional forms (disciplines and nation states), an Afro-Brazilian theory of the creative process, intersubjectivity as epistemology, the all-or-nothing syndrome and the human condition, and perspectives from Africa on epistemology and ethics.
Thomas proposes that the time has come to focus instead on Cook's anthropological and scientific contributions.
Thus what began as an anti-imperialistic anthropological and historiographical romanticizing of native male Americans has been to some degree converted into a gay view that the large majority of those who became berdaches, in Will Roscoe's words, "did so entirely of their own volition." Indeed, Roscoe assures his readers that "most recent works see the berdaches not as passive but as agents, with free will." (11)