anthropometry

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an·thro·pom·e·try

 (ăn′thrə-pŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
The study of human body measurement for use in anthropological classification and comparison.

an′thro·po·met′ric (-pə-mĕt′rĭk), an′thro·po·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
an′thro·po·met′ri·cal·ly adv.
an′thro·pom′e·trist n.

anthropometry

(ˌænθrəˈpɒmɪtrɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the comparative study of sizes and proportions of the human body
anthropometric, ˌanthropoˈmetrical adj
ˌanthropoˈmetrically adv
ˌanthroˈpometrist n

an•thro•pom•e•try

(ˌæn θrəˈpɒm ɪ tri)

n.
the measurement of the size and proportions of the human body, esp. as an aid for comparative study in physical anthropology.
[1830–40]
an`thro•po•met′ric (-pəˈmɛ trɪk) an`thro•po•met′ri•cal, adj.

anthropometry

the study concerned with the measurements of the proportions, size, and weight of the human body. — anthropometrist, n. — anthropometric, anthropometrical, adj.
See also: Anatomy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthropometry - measurement and study of the human body and its parts and capacitiesanthropometry - measurement and study of the human body and its parts and capacities
measurement, measuring, mensuration, measure - the act or process of assigning numbers to phenomena according to a rule; "the measurements were carefully done"; "his mental measurings proved remarkably accurate"
Translations

anthropometry

[ˌænθrəˈpɒmɪtrɪ] Nantropometría f
References in periodicals archive ?
Body mass, standing height, waist girth, and skinfolds were measured by a certified anthropometrist, according to international standards developed by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (Marfell-Jones et al.
5] ISAK Criterion Anthropometrist, Criterion Photoscopic Somatotype Rater and Head of Nutrition Department, I.
At the first appointment an International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) level one accredited anthropometrist measured skin fold thickness from six sites (triceps, subscapular, supraspinale, abdominal, medial calf and thigh) to the nearest millimeter, according to ISAK protocols using calibrated skin calipers.
Weight status: Anthropometric measurements were taken by postgraduate students under the supervision of a level III anthropometrist.
All anthropometric measures were performed by an experienced anthropometrist (JEB).
The research nurses received regular training within the department and participated in annual quality control exercises when an anthropometrist supervised their measurement techniques.