anthropomorphosis

anthropomorphosis

(ˌænθrəpəˈmɔːfəsɪs)
n
transformation into human form
References in periodicals archive ?
The themes they examine are delineating the boundaries of the human, empathy and the constitution of the self, visualizing the body politic, anthropomorphosis and its critics, anthropomorphosis and its conditions, figuring the impossible, and metamorphic figuration.
In this way modernity, here understood as a single object that is reified but also animated by anthropomorphosis, is couched as the ability to experience novelty--which from the perspective of its natural observers means the capacity to see new men, trees and skies (12).
Venuti explains that Schleiermacher's anthropomorphosis of translation from an intertextual to an intersubjective relationship psychologizes the translated text.
As the fable progresses it becomes clear that the urban mouse actively seeks anthropomorphosis while being at some pains to draw a distinction between herself and her sister, using human versus animal terms.
Coleridge's anthropomorphosis of the weeds--again, weeds--implies that ideas and impressions seem closer to being sociable companions than himself and his peers.
When she imagines her body in materialist terms ("of feebler Seeds design'd"), inanimate matter undergoes anthropomorphosis and human emotion is reduced to micromechanical processes and unlocalized desire.
Not even that immaculate note of Christian anthropomorphosis was equal to zero, the sustained C of waiting.
But in peeling back the shoe's skin (its "external lock-down sheath") to reveal this and eight other separate surface layers, the shoe's designers have effected a subtle anthropomorphosis.
In other poems, instead of a binding tension, anthropomorphosis (the "pathetic fallacy") turns nature into transcendental kitsch and disturbs even a simple and self-sustaining clarity of image; or a first-person reference intrudes, as in the title poem, in simplistic identification with nature.
Our interest in the anthropomorphosis of the animal world has kept David Attenborough in a career.
Bruce Clarke, "Fabulous Monsters of Conscience: Anthropomorphosis in Keats's Lamia," SiR 23 (Winter 1984): 555-79.