anthroposophy

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Related to anthroposophist: Rudolf Steiner

an·thro·pos·o·phy

 (ăn′thrə-pŏs′ə-fē)
n.
A system of beliefs and practice based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner and maintaining that by correct training and personal discipline one can attain experience of the spiritual world.


an′thro·po·soph′i·cal (-pə-sŏf′ĭ-kəl) adj.
an′thro·pos′o·phist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anthroposophy

(ˌænθrəˈpɒsəfɪ)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) the spiritual and mystical teachings of Rudolph Steiner, based on the belief that creative activities such as myth making, which formed a part of life in earlier times, are psychologically valuable, esp for educational and therapeutic purposes
anthroposophic adj
ˌanthroˈposophist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•thro•pos•o•phy

(ˌæn θrəˈpɒs ə fi)

n.
a spiritual and mystical philosophy based on the teachings of Rudolf Steiner.
[1910–15; < German]
an`thro•po•soph′i•cal (-pəˈsɒf ɪ kəl) an`thro•po•soph′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

anthroposophy

a movement developed from theosophy by Rudolf Steiner, Austrian social philosopher, to develop the faculty of cognition and the awareness of spiritual reality, — anthroposophist, n. — anthroposophical, adj.
See also: Mankind
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

anthroposophy

From the Greek “anthropos,” meaning man, and sophia,” meaning wisdom. Rudolf Steiner said anthroposophy should mean awareness of one’s humanity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anthroposophy - a system of beliefs and practices based on the philosophy of Rudolf Steiner; it claims to integrate the practical and psychological in child-centered education
system of rules, system - a complex of methods or rules governing behavior; "they have to operate under a system they oppose"; "that language has a complex system for indicating gender"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
antroposofi

anthroposophy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Our HeartMath batch was blessed to have in company four pranic healers, one reiki healer, one cranio-sacral healer, an anthroposophist, and some medical professionals, who all brought into the safe space what they knew about keeping the heart coherent.
He also knew from manuscript the work of his student and friend Viktor Ullmann, who in 1935 finished his opera Der Sturz des Antichrist (The Fall of the Antichrist), based on a drama by the anthroposophist poet Albert Steffen.
One explanation that has been tentatively advanced is that the documents may have been linked to Carl Alexander Mier (1902-1975), an anthroposophist and secretary of the Biodynamic Agricultural Association.
Germany, 1935: Rudolf Hauschka, Austrian chemist, inventor, author, entrepreneur and anthroposophist (his methodologies influenced greatly by Rudolf Steiner), founded the first WALA laboratory where he invented the "rhythmic" production process: Based on the cyclical patterns found in nature, he developed natural medicines that did not use alcohol as a preservative.
He had many influences: the sculptural forms of Constantine Brancusi, the design philosophies of Frank Lloyd Wright and anthroposophist Rudolph Steiner, as well as other visual artists, theatrical innovators, and literary pioneers.
Tolkien was Catholic; Barfield, Anthroposophist; Lewis, a "mere Christian"; Charles Williams, Anglican with a dash of ritual magic.