bevacizumab

(redirected from anti-VEGF drugs)
Also found in: Medical.

bev·a·ciz·u·mab

 (bĕv′ə-sĭz′ə-măb′)
n.
A humanized monoclonal antibody that acts as an angiogenesis inhibitor, used intravenously to treat metastatic colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer.

[beva-, origin unknown + -ci-, cardiovascular infix + -zu-, humanized + -m(onoclonal) a(nti)b(ody).]
References in periodicals archive ?
The advent of anti-VEGF drugs aimed at preventing the growth of new blood vessels dramatically changed the prognosis for many patients with the disease.
Various dosing regimens of Zimura were administered in combination with Lucentis in patients with wet AMD who have not been previously treated with anti-VEGF drugs.
Various dosing regimens of Zimura were administered in combination with Lucentis in patients with wet AMD who have not been previously treated with anti-VEGF drugs. Based on a preliminary analysis of the safety data from this trial, Zimura combination therapy was generally well tolerated after six months of treatment.
In recent years, several reports have demonstrated the impact of anti-VEGF drugs upon different cell cultures in vitro.
Previous studies have reported that inhibition of VEGF with anti-VEGF drugs could reduce retinal permeability and neovascularization [8, 9].
Costagliola, "Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of anti-VEGF drugs after intravitreal injection," Current Drug Metabolism, vol.
Since the recognition of the role of inflammation and importance of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, treatment options have been altered with anti-VEGF drugs, and corticosteroids have taken an active role in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy [4-7].
Fortunately, the licensing of intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs (Lucentis and Eylea) for the management of nAMD has revolutionised treatment strategies over the past decade.
The compound that enables delivery of the anti-VEGF drugs is a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), which potentially could be used to deliver medications for other ocular diseases that need to be applied to the posterior chamber of the eye.
Despite the benefits of intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs, interest in the use of oral drug candidates has been increasing [15-17].
However, frequent anti-VEGF injections are prohibitive for most patients because of the high costs of the anti-VEGF drugs.
This study was to establish a rat retinal edema model and explore the related VEGF expression and observe the responses to anti-VEGF drugs in this model.