anti-roman


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anti-roman

(ɑ̃tirɔmɑ̃)
n, pl anti-romans (ɑ̃tirɔmɑ̃)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) another term for antinovel
[literally: anti-novel]
References in periodicals archive ?
There may be something to this, but it recalls a review of The Passion of the Christ that observed, "The only good Jews were Christians." It was also suggested that I might as well see the stations as anti-Roman too for their unfriendly depictions.
A group of activists with unlikely names like Reg and Stan - The People's Front of Judea - hold a meeting to whip up anti-Roman hatred.
His own view of the Jesus of history is as a "proto-pharisaic rabbi-nationalist closely aligned with the anti-Roman zealot insurrection," which regularly provokes student discussions and debates given the controversial nature of the view.
There are few kind words for the American nativist strain, embodied by political movements like the anti-Roman Catholic Know-Nothing Party that flourished in the 1850s.
Secondly, I believe that, unlike some other past and present members of the Australian hierarchy, Morris was, in a praiseworthy way, "non-Roman" (but never anti-Roman) in his thinking and actions.
In short Palfrey, trained as a "conforming Calvinist" and an anti-Roman agent produced a seeming contradiction.
To be sure, statement's are found which are critical of any human dominance, including the Roman Empire, but it seems wrong to interpret Paul comprehensively in terms of anti-Roman struggles.
It shows the militaristic desires of Judas as an anti-Roman terrorist, and of Paul as imperial preacher, against the family-man potential of Jesus beyond the cross after his mystical visions in the desert, forming a complex tragic sacrifice (Pizzato 2005).
In a recent homily, for instance, Mfiller reflected on an upcoming national assembly of German Catholics set of Regensburg in 2014, basically declaring that an "anti-Roman sentiment" won't fly.
He takes the name from the biblical anti-Roman Judean rebels, The Maccabees.
The remainder of Richard Miles' work suffers from a remarkable anti-Greek and anti-Roman bias, and a tendentious exaggeration of Punic cultural influence.
Note also the choice of language to describe the druids ('insidious' and 'inimical') or the ascription of anti-Roman feeling to 'the more susceptible British chieftains', implying that any right-minded British leader would have recognised the innate superiority of Rome and the opportunities that the Roman Empire offered.