antiblack


Also found in: Thesaurus.

antiblack

(ˈæntɪˌblæk)
adj
showing discrimination against Black people
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.antiblack - discriminatory especially on the basis of race or religionantiblack - discriminatory especially on the basis of race or religion
discriminatory, prejudiced - being biased or having a belief or attitude formed beforehand; "a prejudiced judge"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The moral and historical case for affirmative action programs is powerful; racial preference programs should in no way be equated with antiblack discrimination.
'Negro' doesn't have the same context here as it does abroad - few feel affected by the deeply embedded antiblack racism of the West - but 'negro' or 'negra' is used as a pejorative all the same.
He even contends that economic concerns drove antiblack terrorism, as this violence was most pervasive when labor relations were unstable, while economic growth often brought about a racial detente.
In Jezebel Unhinged: Loosing the Black Female Body in Religion and Culture, independent academic and Feminist Wire founder Tamura Lomax uses the cultural jezebel trope and the biblical Jezebel character to explore the Black Church's duality as "wellspring of black religiosity, cultural formation, and liberatory acts" and an institution mirroring "the antiblack, sexist, classist, homophobic, transantagonistic violence in the rest of the world," particularly in the ways the Black Church and black popular culture produce and engage in discourse about black women and girls and mark them as sexually deviant.
Antiblack and anti-indigenous infrastructures distribute killings, overpolicing, incarceration, toxic exposures, inadequate housing amid the exuberance of individualized choice and commodity spectacle" (pp.
Jackson (2015) is clear that these decontextualizations and erasures essentially make necessary thinking beyond the human in a way that can only have as it's "beyond" an antiblack nonhuman.
It argues that images of Black masculine authority have become increasingly important to the legitimization of contemporary policing and its leading role in the maintenance of an antiblack social order forged by racial slavery and segregation.
His moral vision of hope indicts both Black representational politics of racial solidarity and cultural conservative ideologies rooted in forms of antiblack racism, xenophobia, bigotry, and sexism.
Like its racist counterparts, the stereotype of inbred Appalachian deficiency is ultimately a creation of well-off white Americans: The myth, as Catte puts it, is "a sleight of hand that used working-class people to illustrate the priorities and voting preferences of white middle-class and affluent individuals." Characterizing white poverty as innate closes off the possibility of relieving it; more insidiously, it also serves as a stalking horse for antiblack racism.
Christina Sharpe's In the Wake begins with death; from here she theorizes Black life, trauma, and promise within and through that which the author terms "the long history and present" (115) of an antiblack material and ideological global climate.
In a footnote, Maghbouleh notes that "antiblack discourse and symbols in Iranian culture and history" (196) is one narrative that this book does not explore.

Full browser ?