antiboycott

antiboycott

(ˌæntɪˈbɔɪkɒt)
adj
opposed to boycotts
References in periodicals archive ?
He also represented those charged with violating the antiboycott statute during the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
law and policy affecting international trade and business, including export control laws, sanctions programs, foreign investment laws, anticorruption laws and antiboycott regulations.
And then the contract might involve approval from a Singapore parent corporation, a finance subsidiary in a third country with a favorable tax treaty, collateral in six other countries, an Iranian party that raises concerns regarding US sanctions and a German party that cannot join such sanctions under German antiboycott laws, and an American party who triggers new US tax reporting rules.
Antiboycott Compliance Legislation Export-Related Antiboycott Legislation Tax-Related Antiboycott Legislation Contacts Author Contact Information
This was the case when the United States enacted antiboycott legislation to penalize any companies that complied with the Arab boycott of Israel.
Under US antiboycott legislation enacted in 1978, US firms are prohibited from compliance with any such boycott directly or for a third party, and are required to report any such request to the US Department of Commerce.
Isn't this bill exactly like the American Antiboycott Compliance, which prohibits companies from supporting the Arab League's (now-deceased) boycott of Israel?
Berman's bill the Technology' Security and Antiboycott Act, would repeal the EAA and replace the authority in that law with a new statutory proposal that reflects the numerous technological advances and global changes that have occurred since 1979.
Because the United States does not wish to infringe upon the right of any country to choose its own trading partners, the antiboycott laws do not target primary
Antiboycott Laws, OFAC Sanctions, Export Controls, and the Economic Espionage Act, in NEGOTIATING AND STRUCTURING INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS 200-03 (Mark R.
Nestle added fuel to the fire when it ran an antiboycott ad in the Oxford Independent, a student newspaper at Oxford Brooks University (Wilkinson, 1999).
Thus, when commenting on antiboycott decrees, the AFL would point out that had the action taken by the labor organization instead been taken by manufacturers, it "might have been fairly considered a legitimate battle of trade with which a court of equity should not have interfered," but courts granted "a certain class immunity against the ordinary vicissitudes and hazards of business.