anticipative


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an·tic·i·pa·tive

 (ăn-tĭs′ə-pā′tĭv, -pə-tĭv)
adj.
Expectant.

an·tic′i·pa′tive·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.anticipative - marked by eager anticipationanticipative - marked by eager anticipation; "an expectant hush"
hopeful - having or manifesting hope; "a line of people hopeful of obtaining tickets"; "found a hopeful way of attacking the problem"

anticipative

adjective
Having or marked by expectation:
Translations
antizipativ
References in classic literature ?
The country custom of unreserved comradeship out of doors during betrothal was the only custom she knew, and to her it had no strangeness; though it seemed oddly anticipative to Clare till he saw how normal a thing she, in common with all the other dairy-folk, regarded it.
He had a singular red cap on, - not like a sailor's cap, but of a finer colour; and as the few yielding planks between him and destruction rolled and bulged, and his anticipative death-knell rung, he was seen by all of us to wave it.
Many protestations of friendship, and expressions anticipative of the pleasure which must inevitably flow from so happy an acquaintance, were exchanged, and the visitors departed, with renewed assurances that at all times and seasons the mansion of the Wititterlys would be honoured by receiving them beneath its roof.
De meme, les colonnes mobiles ont ete mobilisees dans une action anticipative avant le 1er juillet, comme prevu chaque annee.
Individuals under this category are likely to reveal intimate emotions, personal anxieties, and even anticipative cravings.
Consequently, anticipative transmission investment can help to efficiently integrate generation capacities based on renewable energy sources into electricity systems.
than reflections, the latter of which he disdainfully referred to as "personal philosophy." This textual excision is illustrative of the principle controversies regarding the author's memoir style, characterized by inner monologues of self-analysis and intricate subjectivity, anticipative of the future decade's stream of consciousness technique of Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and William Faulkner, and the editor's conservative Howellsian aesthetics catering, in his magazine, to a traditional readership.
He stood right at the entrance of the auditorium and greeted the anticipative audience while showing them to their seats.
For this discussion, sustaining organizational change is defined as "the continuous, anticipative, and adaptive movement (thinking and actions) taken by organizational members to achieve a desired future." (32)