antick

(redirected from anticke)

antick

(ˈæntɪk) or

anticke

n
old-fashioned antic
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"Grotto-esque" artwork was "a kinde of rugged vnpolished painters worke, anticke worke," or "artwork appropriate to caves or grotta." OED Online, s.v.
U ruskim lingvistickim znanstvenim radovima i istrazivanjima koji se bave rodnim elementima u jeziku (Edmondson 2009, Mitrofanova 2009, Rjabov 1997) opcenito prevladava misljenje da se ruski jezik i naivna slika svijeta koja se u njemu odrazava u najvecoj mjeri uklapaju u androcentricni karakter vecine europskih kultura vidljiv od anticke filozofske misli preko srednjovjekovne krscanske filozofije sve do suvremenosti.
17; on Sidney and Greek tragedy, see also Sarah Knight, '"Goodlie anticke apparrell"?
The word is printed "anticke" in the Second Quarto and "Antike" in the Folio and First Quarto, clowning Horatio's efforts at classical allusion.
Or, more precisely, what is an "Anticke disposition" (Q2 and F)?
As the seventeenth century advanced, the meaning chimera was transferred from anticke to grotesca and finally to grotesque (cf.
"Istocnogotski zenski grob iz anticke Narone," Radovi Filozofskog fakulteta u Zadru 34, pp.
John Webster, for instance, complained of, "Anticke gesticulations, dances, and other Mimicke postures, devised onely for the vulgar, who are better delighted with that which pleaseth the eye, than contenteth the eare" (Bevington 44).
In addition to having "ffrisking soules" that "danc't Anticke all ye while" (419,l.
A brief section speculating about the music for the masque might also have been in order, if only to follow Peter Walls in warning against placing too much (if any) stock in surviving dance tunes with titles like "The Lord Hays his Masque," "The Lo rd Hayes his first Masque," and "Essex Anticke Masque" (in British Library, Add.
The famous warriors of the anticke world, Used Trophees to erect in stately wize: in which they would the records have enrold, of theyr great deeds and valarous emprize.
Neill's observation is made in an article called 'Anticke Pagentrie', a quotation from Perkin Warbeck, and antics feature again in the second parallel between the two texts.