anticoagulant

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Related to anticoagulant poisoning: aspirin poisoning, rodenticide poisoning, warfarin poisoning

an·ti·co·ag·u·lant

 (ăn′tē-kō-ăg′yə-lənt, ăn′tī-)
n.
A substance that slows or prevents the clotting of blood.
adj.
Acting as an anticoagulant.

an′ti·co·ag′u·la′tive (-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv) adj.

anticoagulant

(ˌæntɪkəʊˈæɡjʊlənt)
adj
(Medicine) acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
n
(Pharmacology) an agent that prevents or impairs coagulation

an•ti•co•ag•u•lant

(ˌæn ti koʊˈæg yə lənt, ˌæn taɪ-)

adj.
1. Also, an•ti•co•ag•u•la•tive (-ˌleɪ tɪv, -lə tɪv) preventing coagulation, esp. of blood.
n.
2. an anticoagulant agent, as heparin.
[1900–05]

anticoagulant

A drug used to decrease the clotting ability of the blood, especially after heart surgery.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anticoagulant - medicine that prevents or retards the clotting of bloodanticoagulant - medicine that prevents or retards the clotting of blood
dicoumarol, dicumarol - an anticoagulant drug that has now been largely replaced by warfarin
heparin, Lipo-Hepin, Liquaemin - a polysaccharide produced in basophils (especially in the lung and liver) and that inhibits the activity of thrombin in coagulation of the blood; it (trade names Lipo-Hepin and Liquaemin) is used as an anticoagulant in the treatment of thrombosis and in heart surgery
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
Coumadin, warfarin - an anticoagulant (trade name Coumadin) use to prevent and treat a thrombus or embolus
Translations
antikoagulantti

anticoagulant

[ˈæntɪkəʊˈægjʊlənt]
A. ADJanticoagulante
B. Nanticoagulante m

anticoagulant

[ˌæntɪkəʊˈægjʊlnt] adj & nanticoagulante (m)

an·ti·co·ag·u·lant

n. anticoagulante, medicamento usado para evitar coágulos.

anticoagulant

adj & n anticoagulante m; lupus — anticoagulante lúpico
References in periodicals archive ?
5 mg/kg IM every 4-8 hours was effective in 8 out of 9 of raptors with suspect anticoagulant poisoning.
Male and female mountain lions that had been roaming back and forth between the Simi Hills and the Santa Susana Mountains were found dead in the Simi Hills last fall from anticoagulant poisoning, possibly from eating other animals that had been poisoned.
When people put out poison bait to kill rodents, it can go up the food chain, killing larger animals, like two mountain lions found dead last fall in the Simi Hills from anticoagulant poisoning.

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