anticommunism


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anticommunism

(ˌæntɪˈkɒmjʊnɪzəm)
n
the opposition to communism
References in periodicals archive ?
For Edwards, the anticommunism of his father's generation became real in Europe in 1956, with the Hungarian uprising against the Soviet yoke and the plight of young anticommunists in Budapest.
He effectively demonstrates that white Southerners shared common regional assumptions and interests, which led them to favor interventionism, anticommunism, and the use of force in foreign policy.
Rachel Peterson, "Correspondence: Journalism, Anticommunism, and Marxism in 1950s Detroit," in Robbie Lieberman and Clarence Lang, eds, Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement [New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2009], 122)
At first, anticommunism provided a powerful incentive to collaborate.
In Part Three Seecharan discusses Martin Carter's poetry of protest and the anticommunism and cultural idealism of Balram Singh Rai (Guyana's first minister of Home Affairs whose term was short-lived due to Jagan), but above all he uses his scalpel to dissect Cheddi Jagan and his politics, characterizing him as indefatigable and honest, politically inflexible, unable to forge alliances, and doctrinaire.
How successfully a transnational approach can be applied to the twin phenomena of communism and anticommunism is an interesting question.
During the Cold War, the Saudis' staunch anticommunism made them a natural partner in our competition with the Soviets.
This period of time, from 1946 to the present day, reads primarily like an encyclopedia entry of events: education, marriage, academia, and family, though several of the stories discussing postwar politics, the peace movement, and anticommunism stand out.
The Royal Family didn't see anything negative with the rise of Hitler because of the enormous anticommunism feeling.
Better social policy is impossible in a country with so much anticommunism.
While Rubin is right to contrast the explorative journals of the earlier modernist period with the ideologically more cautious magazine like Encounter, according to his own description the Encounter was more diverse in its approach, mixing "the subjectivities of Bloomsbury with the anticommunism of such New York intellectuals as Mary McCarthy and Leslie Fiedler" (53).
Men and women who had worked for leftish agencies like the National Labor Relations Board and the short-lived Consumers' Division of the Office of Price Administration might be labeled communist, as might anybody thought ever to have expressed subversive ideas of any sort, including even former socialists whose credo relied on explicit anticommunism.