antidogmatic

antidogmatic

(ˌæntɪdɒɡˈmætɪk)
adj
opposed to dogma
References in periodicals archive ?
Hart sometimes sounds antidogmatic, but it is more a question of the secondariness of dogma relative to the foundational role of what Jesus does when he teaches us.
This stress is very different from the rational, scientific trends in Buddhism today, instead emphasizing a "blind obedience in the patriarchs" (54) that may conflict with the antidogmatic and protestant sentiments that drive much of modern Buddhism.
The urban spaces reshaped by squatters also connected activists emerging from a fragmenting student movement with fiercely antidogmatic and antihierarchical subcultures such as Punk, which had a strong base among working- and lower-middle--class young people.
Early Theosophists attracted to Eddy's teachings may have valued her antidogmatic and anti-creedal ethos, radical revision of Eve's fall, universal teaching of God's love, and timeless representation of the Christ, among other elements.
Jason Rampelt explores how the noncreedal, antidogmatic Quaker religion of the English physicist-astronomer Arthur Eddington affected both his philosophy of science and his research program; see also Matthew Stanley's Practical Mystic: Religion, Science, and A.
Thus Giedroyc's journal was dynamic, nonideological, and antidogmatic. Giedroyc's leading idea was that in politics, the most important thing is to remain close to reality and try to correct what needs to be corrected while not disturbing the reality's rhythms.
forward-looking, activist, empirical, skeptical, antidogmatic, [and]
It is this antidogmatic approach that suggests Beecher's aim is not, in fact, biblical criticism but rather a more general concern with how to derive the fundamental Christian ethics that he believes can be located in Christ's philosophy rather than in specific historical circumstances or actions.
Interdisciplinarity demands, beyond the overcoming of logical barriers, both a personal and antidogmatic attitude and a constant struggle against arrogance, vanity and professional chauvinism.
His first novel, The Times of Miracles (1965), clearly foreshadowed the two perhaps most important characteristics of his art: his antidogmatic views and his skepticism with regard to "progress." How to Quiet a Vampire (1977) was long suppressed by the publishing company Nolit: quite appropriately, it offers an insight into the mechanisms of the logic and psychology of modern totalitarianism.
The importance of the individual contact and the significance of relationships with others are both central to his humanist worldview, and there is a real sense in Todorov's evocation of Barthes that the man was more important than the scholar and his theories, which Todorov goes so far as to regard as "a kind of intellectual terrorism," in contradiction with the antidogmatic irony that Barthes displayed (87).
Arnold set himself against conservatism as the most dangerously revolutionary of principles: "there is nothing so unnatural and so convulsive to society as the strain to keep things fixed, when all the world is by the very law of its creation in eternal progress." (4) When John Henry Newman, leader of the AngloCatholic (or "High") branch of the Church of England, declared that liberalism was "the enemy," and that by liberalism he meant "the Antidogmatic Principle," Arnold was among the principal culprits he had in mind, particularly "some free views of Arnold about the Old Testament." (5)