antieconomic

antieconomic

(ˌæntɪˌɛkəˈnɒmɪk)
adj
against economic growth or wellbeing
References in periodicals archive ?
Responding to this variety in antielitism sentiments in populist discourse, four types of populist communication can be placed into this core category: antiestablishment, antieconomic elites, antiexperts, and antimedia populism.
Moving beyond scapegoating the political elites, antieconomic elites populism constructs the people's opposition to profit-maximizing elites who threaten the material interests of ordinary hardworking citizens.
From the point at which the MPPw has null value, the antieconomic production stage is characterized, because the increment in the applied water depths leads to decrease of production (Carvalho et al., 2011).
Scholars of non-or antieconomic bent have had trouble coming up with a unifying approach to fiduciary duties because they are looking for the wrong things.
As John Frow argues, Bataille's notion of unproductive expenditure, exemplified in the institution of potlatch, is a theorisation of "antieconomic and antiutilitarian excess" (38) whose value is waste or loss.
In the case of taxes, these generalizations turn into practices such as general or indirect taxes, which are certainly easier to design and collect but are also antieconomic and essentially unfair for the simple reason that they burden people and economic activities that should not be burdened.
The mechanism was deliberately rough-looking, and the artist's intent ironic, with the whole setup suggesting a useless, antieconomic activity, based on pure expenditure.
Although we have emphasized the antieconomic character of traditional religious research, we do not advocate that contemporary research become anti-sociological.
[and] antieconomic analysis," but that "Epstein no longer fears utilitarian or economic analysis").
An optimal scale, beyond which growth is antieconomic, exists even if we think of the nonhuman part of creation as having only instrumental value to humans and no intrinsic value in its own right.
The last verse specifically explains the antieconomic character of an economy governed by greed: "It draws men away from faith," that is to say, from a Christian life, and submerges the body and soul in worries that are of a purely economic character (the first error).
It argues that Christianity has revolutionized the antieconomic and stagnant religions of antiquity and traditional societies, and thus has been a factor in secularization, individualization, and growth.