antielitist

antielitist

(ˌæntɪɪˈliːtɪst)
adj
against elitism, populist
n
a person opposed to elitism
References in periodicals archive ?
But today, there seems to be an antielitist drive reflected in our education system.
The Princeton political scientist Jan-Werner Muller proposes another characteristic: "In addition to being antielitist, populists are always antipluralist," he argues in 2016's What Is Populism?
Medieval Italy's democratic institutions succumbed to what we might now call populism: an antielitist, antipluralistic and exclusionary strategy for building a coalition of the discontented.
Populist leaders, broadly defined, then, who can be "right wing" or "left wing," present themselves as outsiders and proclaim to speak for "the people" using various antielitist discourses.
Within countries, he is encouraging antielitist and anti-globalisation movements.
Well, non-elites--that is, the working and middle classes, black and white, whose supposed interests are invoked as cover for whatever the loudest antielitist intends to do.
Further, this cluster appeared to hold fairly strong antielitist tendencies, yet they did not necessarily hold strong opinions about who should be included.
We're Alive, as a zombie tale rife with unabashedly campy elements, is effective not in spite of its genre, but because of it; it is exactly the type of antielitist media that Haraway suggests is capable of a more collaborative engagement with its audience.
Bush's evangelical identity, proud Texas identification (however carefully marketed), and antielitist bent (again, a well-crafted affair) were all reflective of Sunbelt politics in the latter part of the twentieth century.
9 BRENDAN FOWLER A true antielitist more invested in process than in product, Fowler makes objects that are nonetheless as beautiful as they_are stimulating.
Paul's movement, with its antielitist and populist tone and its opposition to centralized government, can clearly be grouped with the Jacksonian movement on a variety of issues.