antientropic

antientropic

(ˌæntiːɛnˈtrəʊpɪk; ˌæntiːɛnˈtrɒpɪk)
adj
showing a tendency towards order
References in periodicals archive ?
To appreciate the possible significance of selection as a general antientropic process, it helps to consider what we already know about how selection operates at the biological level.
Biological natural selection (BNS) (intended as shorthand for all types of biological selection, including natural selection proper [3], sexual selection [4], and kin selection [5]), then, is the strongest known antientropic process, because it creates organisms.
As noted above, we can judge the extent to which an organismal trait is likely to be an adaptation by conducting a probability assessment: traits that are more complexly ordered are less likely to arise by chance and thus more likely to be the direct product of the strongest documented antientropic process, BNS.
As the most improbable known thing in the universe, designed by the strongest known antientropic process, life seems more likely than black holes--or any other known entity--to be a CNS-designed adaptation.
These ideas are conceptual forerunners of DAT's psi-separation of the good and bad seed and the antientropic nature of psi.
In natural systems, biogeochemical cycles are governed by several laws: matter (including pollutants) is concentrated some 10 times from one level to another (Petri[section]or, 2008a; Vadineanu, 1998), energy is conserved (first law of thermodynamics), but partially dissipated as heat, resulting into increased entropy (disorder) towards thermodynamic equilibrium (Botnariuc, 1999); this trend is organizational, thus antientropic (Botnariuc, 1999; Vadineanu, 1998).
As Rubenstein indicates, we must look for other signs to judge its life/death status: namely, the antientropic dynamics underlying self-maintenance and self-development.
From this perspective, morality opposes the community disaggregation having an antientropic function.
Learning is an antientropic energy-consuming process, so do not overtax the system.
If one cancels the difference between water and fire, Socrates seems to be appealing to an antientropic principle, to which we can assign, following the Phaedo and Phaedrus, the name soul.
Bataille's view of expenditure might seem antientropic: the sun produces too much energy; the surplus has to be spent.