antierotic

antierotic

(ˌæntɪɪˈrɒtɪk)
adj
discouraging sexual desire
References in periodicals archive ?
Lesbian writers such as Joan Nestle found Rich's essay insulting, pedantic, and antierotic when it was first published.' Rich's essay likely achieved its notoriety more for the concept of compulsory heterosexuality it popularized, than for the concept of lesbian continuum or lesbian existence.
More discriminating treatment of the two words could help in deciding such questions as whether the Republic is antierotic or turns philosophy into "erosophy."
He observes that "[w]e take the shape of sex education almost for granted today, but cut away at the tree and you see concentric circles of historically specific elements, such as the politicized character of sex education, the centrality of public education, the dominance of instrumentalist thinking, and sex education's antierotic bias." MORAN, supra note 31, at 230.
(47) The objet petit a is for Lacan not the object of desire (which in Philostratus would be the boy and the youths to whom he speaks, or the works of art themselves in an estheticist and antierotic reading) but the object-causing-desire.
Because sexual abuse is a transhistorical phenomenon, MacKinnon concludes that "sexuality is the set of practices that inscribes gender as unequal in social life." (7) By construing the history of feminism as antierotic, queer history's celebration of a sexuality freed from gender difference has left historians of sexuality open to MacKinnon's attack.
For not only do we touch our most proroundly creative source, but we do that which is female and self-affirming in the face of a racist, patriarchal, and antierotic society."