antifungal drugs

Related to antifungal drugs: fluconazole

antifungal drugs

Used to prevent or treat fungal infections, locally (on the skin) or systemically.
References in periodicals archive ?
ustus infections may be of infection control importance, as the clinical isolates exhibited low susceptibilities to multiple antifungal drugs, as was reported previously (12,17).
This increase, together with the fact that most drugs currently available for the treatment of these infections have significant limitations - limited efficacy, toxicity, problems with drug-drug interactions and the generation of resistant organisms - has created an immediate unmet need for new and novel antifungal drugs.
There are only 3 classes of antifungal drugs available to treat these invasive diseases and resistance against these drugs is increasing.
The researchers say that their findings attain significance because only one new class of antifungal drugs has been introduced in the last two decades, and they must be administered intravenously.
Several antifungal drugs were used, but the lesions did not improve.
Other strategies, such as precautionary treatment with antifungal drugs, can only be partially successful in combating these infections.
albicans is the predominant etiologic agent of candidiasis, other Candida species that tend to be less susceptible to the commonly used antifungal drugs such as C.
It acts by inhibiting glucan synthase, the enzyme responsible for maintaining the fungal cell wall and is thus fungicidal against a broad range of pathogens including those that have become resistant to currently-used antifungal drugs.
The case isolate was tested to determine its susceptibility to five antifungal drugs.
The significant market opportunity for antifungal drugs has attracted many pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies to become involved in R&D.
Merck's demonstrated leadership in antifungal R&D and in the marketing of antifungal drugs makes the company an ideal partner for the development of novel drugs based on AureoGen's aureobasidin A chemistry.