antiglobulin


Also found in: Medical.

antiglobulin

(ˌæntɪˈɡlɒbjʊlɪn)
n
(Medicine) a serum containing an antibody specific to an immunoglobulin
References in periodicals archive ?
The reagents will be used for performing the following immuno-hematological tests: - grouping abo-rh1, - rh-kel1 phenotyping, - rai screening, - newborn abo-rh1 grouping, - identification, - direct compatibility test in the laboratory, - direct antiglobulin test, - extended phenotyping.
In blood banks and clinical laboratories, pretransfusion compatibility assessments typically involve two types of tests: the antibody screen test and the direct antiglobulin test (DAT).
Bio-Rad provides a wide variety of platforms, reagents, data management, and connectivity solutions to address different blood typing needs, offering efficient and reliable results for blood grouping, phenotyping, crossmatching, antibody screening and identification, direct antiglobulin tests, and single antigen typing.
Detection of alloantibodies using a sensitive antiglobulin microtoxicity test: identification of low levels of pre-formed antibodies in accelerated allograft rejection.
Those samples were tested further for the presence of weak D-antigen by an indirect antiglobulin procedure.
INTRODUCTION AND BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DIRECT ANTIGLOBULIN TEST
In a study, infants were recognized to be at risk of developing hemolytic disease secondary to ABO incompatibility, when they had a positive direct antiglobulin test.
Laboratory investigations were parasitologic (thick and thin blood smears), hematologic (differential blood count), and biochemical (haptoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], C-reactive protein, potassium, and sodium levels and renal and liver function tests) examinations; screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; and immunohematologic examinations (direct and indirect antiglobulin test, including testing with enzyme-treated erythrocytes).
Blood group incompatibility with positive direct antiglobulin test, other known hemolytic disease (e.
Laboratory tests (increased free hemoglobin, increased lactate dehydrogenase, and decreased haptoglobin) revealed a direct antiglobulin test (DAT)negative hemolytic anemia.
Previously used methods are all obsolete, with only the mixed antiglobulin reaction (MAR) test and the immunobead test (IBT) being used to detect the presence of ASA (World Health Organization, 1999).
A Turkish study concluded that reticulocyte count, the presence of a sibling with neonatal jaundice and a positive direct antiglobulin test were good predictors for the development of significant hyperbilirubinemia and a serum bilirubin levels of 4 mg/dL and 6 mg/dL at six hours of life are good predictors of severe hyperbilirubinemia.