antihydrogen


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Related to antihydrogen: antihelium

an·ti·hy·dro·gen

 (ăn′tē-hī′drə-jən, ăn′tī-)
n.
The antimatter equivalent of hydrogen.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antihydrogen

(ˈæntɪˌhaɪdrədʒən)
n
(Chemistry) hydrogen in which the nucleus is an antiproton with an orbiting positron
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Precision studies of hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms, for example, reveal similarities to beyond the billionth decimal place.
To understand this discrepancy and solve the mystery of our existence, a group of physicists forged an atom of "antihydrogen" in an underground particle and took its most precise observation yet.
Vargas, "Lorentz and CPT tests with hydrogen, antihydrogen, and related systems," Physical Review D: Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology, vol.
Measuring the electric charge of antihydrogen atoms is a way to study any subtle differences between matter and antimatter which could account for the lack of antimatter in the universe.
Ayabe, "Antioxidative and antihydrogen peroxide activities of various herbal teas," Food Chemistry, vol.
Madsen and his colleagues have created a magnetic trap, where atoms of antihydrogen can be held almost stationary in a powerful magnetic field.
A star made of anti-matter, which would be converting antihydrogen into antihelium, would emit antineutrinos and could therefore be told from a star burning normal matter.
Antihydrogen atoms were first created in 1995 but before one can study them they were annihilated after coming in contact with matter.
Nearly two years ago, the ALPHA project--an international collaboration involving Canadian scientists--announced it had trapped antihydrogen for the first time.
More than 300 atoms of "antihydrogen" were bottled in a magnetic trap for more than a quarter of an hour - 5,000 times longer than has been achieved before.
If an electrically neutral beam of anti-matter, such as of antihydrogen atoms, could be formed in a horizontal direction, such a beam would be deflected upwards if consisting of negative mass.