antihydrogen


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Related to antihydrogen: antihelium

an·ti·hy·dro·gen

 (ăn′tē-hī′drə-jən, ăn′tī-)
n.
The antimatter equivalent of hydrogen.

antihydrogen

(ˈæntɪˌhaɪdrədʒən)
n
(Chemistry) hydrogen in which the nucleus is an antiproton with an orbiting positron
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References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of basic questions on fundamental interactions, the static structure of antiprotonic atoms, CPT tests by high-resolution spectroscopy on antihydrogen, as well as gravity experiments.
Measuring the electric charge of antihydrogen atoms is a way to study any subtle differences between matter and antimatter which could account for the lack of antimatter in the universe.
Madsen and his colleagues have created a magnetic trap, where atoms of antihydrogen can be held almost stationary in a powerful magnetic field.
A star made of anti-matter, which would be converting antihydrogen into antihelium, would emit antineutrinos and could therefore be told from a star burning normal matter.
Antihydrogen atoms were first created in 1995 but before one can study them they were annihilated after coming in contact with matter.
Nearly two years ago, the ALPHA project--an international collaboration involving Canadian scientists--announced it had trapped antihydrogen for the first time.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- The ALPHA Collaboration, an international team of scientists working at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, has created and stored a total of 309 antihydrogen atoms, some for up to 1,000 seconds (almost 17 minutes), with an indication of much longer storage time as well.
If an electrically neutral beam of anti-matter, such as of antihydrogen atoms, could be formed in a horizontal direction, such a beam would be deflected upwards if consisting of negative mass.
The CERN team did so by using a powerful magnetic bottle that held an atom of antihydrogen in its grip for 170 milliseconds.
The Switzerland-based research institute, also known as CERN, said on Wednesday it had produced antihydrogen atoms - the opposite of a hydrogen atom - in a magnetic trap and kept them viable for more than 170 milliseconds.
17] have recently found a new kind of intermolecular interaction known as antihydrogen bond.